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A.S.
07-09-2011, 10:34 AM
It wasn't until my mid 40's that I turned to the gym - and never looked back. I realise that not everyone is willing or able to join a gym, and the subject of 'armchair exercise' was being discussed at mine last week.

I posed the question .... 'are there simple exercises that can be undertaken sitting listening to music?'. It seems that there are and Victoria, the manager of my gym, has an ongoing 'exercise a day' video blog and she's offered to make a few specific Harbeth-audiophile-exercise-whilst-you-listen clips if you're interested .....

Any takers?

Gan CK
07-09-2011, 11:31 AM
Sounds interesting Alan. Some 8 months ago i discovered i had high cholesterol & was overweight by about 12kg for my height. So i started my own programme of exercise & dieting.

Today, after 8 months, i've lost 11kg & cholesterol is now within healthy levels. With some loss of weight, not only is there a better feeling generally, but music from my SHL-5 seems better too.

engjoo
07-09-2011, 11:48 AM
Yes of course. but do consider the fact that very often, Harbeth speakers are used for near field listening! :-)

{Moderator's comment: I assume you mean that whatever exercise mustn't involve arms and legs flailing about!}

keithwwk
07-09-2011, 12:22 PM
Very interesting Alan. I can't wait to watch how to do it.

BAS-H
07-09-2011, 02:47 PM
I do exercise, but prefer to do so first, then relax and listen to music. I tend to exercise in silence. I'm not attracted to gyms except for the pool. Is there any resistance exercise possible at the gym that isn't at home, using your own weight?

Art K
08-09-2011, 02:31 AM
I was quite fit until I sustained several serious sports related injuries in my late 30's. Spent my 40's vacillating in weight between 250 and 280 (I'm 6 ft tall and never weighed over 200 until I was near 40) occasionally going lower in weight but only briefly and in an unhealthy way. I still ate mostly what I wanted though I tried to exercise 4 to 5 times per week I was often injured or felt sick. I now had diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and just about everything else.

Finally I came to a point where something had to give. I weighed 272 lbs again and was tired of being sick...so on 12/19/11 I said that I would try to go one year never missing a day of a good brisk exercise walk (4 1/2 mph) and work out with weights twice a week. I also committed to watching what I eat and completely give up ice cream (which is my favorite food). By give it up I mean never buy it for my home. It's now 9/7/11 and I still haven't missed a day and that includes July 1st of this year, the day after my dear daughter Mandy passed away. I now have 1000 days as a goal...that would be Christmas Eve 2012. My weight is under control and steady (I'm wearing smaller pants than I have since I was in my late 30's). No more high blood pressure or cholesterol, no diabetes...Doctor says it's the most amazing transformation he has ever seen. I told him that it is simple...less input and more output equals sustained weight loss and a better quality of life...simple equation really.

I'm now 51 and feel better than I have for more than 12 yrs, sure wish my daughter were here to share that.

BAS-H
08-09-2011, 09:27 AM
Bravo, Art. Way to go.

Macjager
08-09-2011, 09:59 AM
Count me in, this over 50 stuff is beginning to get annoying!

George

Spindrift
08-09-2011, 11:02 AM
Art K, I applaud you and I offer you my condolances.

Like BasH I'm not attracted to gyms which has mainly to do with previous experiences where trainers were unable or unwilling to adjust to my poor health and low energy-level.
My advise for long listening sessions is to get up and walk around when you've sat for more than 30 minutes, even when music continues to play (CD and esp. streaming make that possible of course) and to change position in the chair/on the sofa, esp. the lower back & legs to encourage bloodflow. Minute neck-exercises are possible but clear lateral movement of the head can of course interfere too much with listening. Perhaps excercise prior to a listening session would be easier but again it all depends on the number of hours spent in the sweetspot.

GregD
08-09-2011, 06:30 PM
I like to do a lot of exercise like weights in the gym, football (soccer), badminton and brisk walking and I find that after all that exertion and hard work, it's a real treat to wind down with a well-deserved listening session.

The exercise makes your mood better and relaxes you, then when the music (via Harbeths) is added to the mix, you can enjoy it so much more knowing you've earned a rest.

For times like that I favour a nice Mozart piano concerto or some Modern Jazz!

thaimusic
09-09-2011, 06:59 AM
Just got back from a 2.5 hr bike ride and saw this thread. If I don't exercise my mood, sleep, productivity and general quality of life goes downhill and the whisky during listening sessions does not taste very good.

A.S.
09-09-2011, 01:57 PM
... I now had diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and just about everything else. Finally I came to a point where something had to give. I weighed 272 lbs again and was tired of being sick......Doctor says it's the most amazing transformation he has ever seen. I told him that it is simple...less input and more output equals sustained weight loss and a better quality of life...simple equation really.

I'm now 51 and feel better than I have for more than 12 yrs, sure wish my daughter were here to share that.First, on behalf of the membership may I express our condolences at your loss which mere words cannot adequately do. Second, may I congratulate you on having the willpower and sensibility to address the input/output equation so successfully.

There are a few unfortunate people who have a metabolism which predisposed them to tremendous weight gain. Most people (like me, and you) are at the fulcrum between enjoying food and the consequences of weight gain. It doesn't take much to tip the balance and pile on the pounds.

GregD
09-09-2011, 02:11 PM
Art K...

I second what Alan said and offer you my personal condolences, I know how painful it is to lose someone so close to you. I lost my mum on 9th April this year - she was 59.

Well done for keeping positive enough to carry on making excellent progress in your own health. I wish you all the best.

Art K
09-09-2011, 02:59 PM
Thank you, Alan. I appreciate the kind words.

I couldn't agree more with your assessment of the weight situation.

delgesu
09-09-2011, 04:23 PM
i also had some problems with my weight after stop smoking.

then i changed my nutrition, no more chocolate, no fast food, no chips etc.
bought a bicycle + hometrainer.

result: minus 15 kilogramms in 1 year + balanced cholesterol + other measurements.

best,
delgesu

Labarum
09-09-2011, 07:00 PM
I was given the hard word by my doctor some years ago and reduced my weight from 118kg to 95kg (my height is 1.90m)

Dieting, yes, but also excercise. I returned to cycling and still do about 25km a day, aged 62.

I treated myself to a classic British Bike hand made for me

See

https://picasaweb.google.com/labarum/BrianSAudax02

Made by

http://www.robinmathercycles.co.uk/

If you want to see more classic British bikes, look here

http://www.pashley.co.uk/

and

http://www.merciancycles.co.uk/

The firms above are, like Harbeth, examples of quality British Engineering

Sebastien
02-10-2011, 03:36 PM
...I posed the question .... 'are there simple exercises that can be undertaken sitting listening to music?'...

Mr. Bob Anderson, the father of "stretching", wrote a book called "Stretching" including many different exercices, even ones that you can do when you are sitting in an airplane, when you're in front of a computer, another while listening to television. Each of these situations are pretty similar to a listening session.

Since years, this book is a reference for me. I suggest it to everyone with an interest in healthy life.

Sébastien

tozen
04-10-2011, 04:18 PM
To cut a long story short, I have found that indoor rowing at home on a waterrower (see http://www.waterrower.com) to be a great form of exercise. They are beautifully made and crafted machines and I was fortunate to find one in good condition second hand for about £400. It has been a good investment. I have a fragile back and have picked up sports related injuries along the way but didn't want to give up pursuing cardiovascular fitness and strength conditioning. The waterrower seems to be working for me and fits into a busy schedule in a way sometimes difficult with the gym. Also, as an added benefit it is very unobtrusive in the home environment.

Art K
05-10-2011, 02:25 AM
Also, as an added benefit it is very unobtrusive in the home environment.

You're kidding right? That thing would take up half of the square footage in my home. Look s well built though.

tozen
05-10-2011, 01:01 PM
No am not kidding. Take a closer look - it sits on it's end when not in use and its footprint is no bigger than a chair's. It is easy to roll into use and then just tilt it back on it's end when not in use. Brilliant design, beautifully made, and very very smooth rowing action.

A.S.
06-10-2011, 11:23 AM
Well I think we're in agreement that sitting slumped in front of our audio equipment has potentially disastrous long-term health consequences. We need to be active and ideally that means sweating, as a result of an elevated heart rate and actually burning energy. Or so I've discovered for myself.

I took up boxing a year ago, have two sessions a week and really enjoy it. Not in a million years did I see myself whacking another person. What I didn't appreciate is that of all gym-type exercises it uses the most energy. There is far, far more skill involved than I imagined. What counts against me is my age - I just cannot move my arms as fast as the youngsters no matter how hard I try and the essence of great boxing is not power but speed. Anyway - if you have a chance try it! Exercise creates more metal space for better quality work. I bitterly regret that I didn't discover the therapeutic effect of exercise until I was in my mid 40s. Big mistake.

Meanwhile, in the comfort of our homes what can we do that at least keeps us flexible? One of my two boxing partners (and the fastest, most agile) is the enterprising gym manageress and she's undertaking a project to create a short exercise video every day for a year. She's at Day 43 now and amazingly, has plenty of ideas in store.

She's suggested that she makes a few special Harbeth-exercise-whilst-you-listen clips for us, all sitting around too long.

Dougal
06-10-2011, 09:42 PM
An inspired choice of subject for a thread, Alan - many thanks for the link to Victoria's blog.

I recently joined a gym, but the dire sound from the PA in their main room puts me off from using the equipment in there. The swimming pool is a calmer environment.

Gyms tend to be rather intimidating places, and the friendliest ones I have encountered have been at hotels. A more physically active job would be the best solution.

jplaurel
08-10-2011, 07:27 AM
This is a very interesting thread to see in a forum focused on audio. I too turned to the gym some years ago and now cannot without regular workouts.

According to my doctor, one of benefits of regular workouts is reduced tinnitus for those who suffer from it. In particular, lowering your blood pressure will help this condition quite a lot. So, get your regular workouts in and your enjoyment of music will also benefit!

A.S.
10-10-2011, 10:21 AM
This is a very interesting thread to see in a forum focused on audio. I too turned to the gym some years ago and now cannot (exist) without regular workouts....The remarkable and unexpected benefit of proper exercise - even a couple of hours every week as a 100% routine - is of how it breaks-down the mental hamster-wheel we can all to easily fall into. Looking back ten or twenty years I can see how I'd become obsessed by daily business/family/technical minutia which would go round and round in my head, achieving nothing but reinforced anxiety. Exercise breaks that break the mental cycle*, and retrains you over the months and years to see life-issues for what they really are - almost always nothing more than minor inconveniences and not worth worrying about.

I have a long-standing theory based on observation of myself and others. I believe that there is a strong, positive correlation between audiophilia (the ceaseless investment of time and money in every smaller audio enhancements) and a lack of physical exercise. I'd wager that even the most die-hard audiophile could be weaned off his obsession after a short course or real, hard, sweaty exercise. And boy, would his entire life open up for the better then! I've observed over many years just how miserable living with audionervosa can be. All that matters is the therapy that music can bring. The equipment is merely the conduit for the music to flow along

*There is nothing magical about this process. If you are physically exerting yourself, your brain is focused on that and there just isn't enough remaining mental processing power to worry about peripheral mental issues. As I started on the rowing machine last week I was deeply in thought about a loudspeaker design speaker matter. I made a mental note to see how long it would be before my attention to the rowing subverted the speaker issue. Much later in the evening at home I realised that I'd completely forgotten about the speakers and even monitoring my attention to them. The rowing had completely flushed my brain within the first few minutes. As Buddhists claim, having an empty, quite brain is hugely refreshing - rather similar to hypnosis I can report.

Don Jr
10-10-2011, 11:15 PM
I herniated my L3 disc back in 1998. They chose not to do surgery because of the direction of the herniation (they would have had to do the surgery from the front). This herniation acts up from time to time and right now is one of those times. I'm only about 5 pounds overweight, but do not exercise often.

I truly believe that this would never reoccur if I were on a routine of exercise. With the cooler months upon me I'm going to try some of Victoria's exercises and possibly seek out a local gym.

Sebastien
12-10-2011, 02:31 AM
As a physical education teacher in elementary school, I found this thread very captivating. I invite all of you to promote physical exercise, which you already seem to do.

Plus I encourage you to be sensitive about the teaching of that discipline from professional people.

Sébastien

Don Jr
12-10-2011, 11:03 PM
Sebastian. It's nice to hear from a physical education teacher. I feel you are among the most important of all teachers. You are nothing without your health, and a young age is the best time to convey this.

I live in the U.S. and there's a lot of porky kids all over the place. Playing outside has been replaced with the Playstation and it's having a very adverse effect on our future generations. I always thought living in a colder climate (I live in Rochester NY) played a big role in how much exercise people get, but having been in Florida recently I find this not to be true. People are just as big. I also found that in Canada the dilemma isn't as bad as here in the U.S. We go to the Montreal Jazz Festival every year, and I didn't notice as many overweight people. This may very well be due to Montreal being a city with great public transportation so people tend to walk more as opposed to driving.

Sebastien
14-10-2011, 01:13 AM
Hi Don,

Thanks for your recognition. Physical education is a complete discipline. It covers motricity, for sure, but also thinking and socio-emotional. These are the elements I work for everyday with my 200+ students from 6 to 12 years old. Sometime, it's difficult to get people realize that we are not animator of ball game. We are pedagogues!

About Montreal, I live there since more than 12 years now and I often go to the States. I can say that you are true. There is less obesity here in Quebec, but it grows. We have to be careful and I want our government to invest in prevention to have a healthy society.

Finally, I'm glad that you enjoy the Montreal Jazz Festival. I do so. What a great event. Plus, please take note that each Fall, there is an Off Montreal Jazz Festival with local artists who are exceptional, even on an international level. Take for example Jean Derome, Pierre Tanguay and Normand Guilbault.

Sébastien

A.S.
24-10-2011, 11:50 AM
To turn the title of this thread around - it should be: Physical exercise - you do need it and (if possible) you must get it! It vastly improves your hearing you know.

I amaze myself how little I know about proper diet. Last week at the gym, I was given a severe ticking-off about the evils of Lucozade, a product promoted to people 'into' exercise. I had no idea that 50% or more of a small bottles content is sugar and by weight that amounts to over twenty of those one-shot sugar sticks used for restaurant coffee. That's a hell of a lot of sugar!

So, the idea of a proper balance between physical and mental health and maximising your enjoyment of music by attention to our overall well being is gathering momentum. Victoria is going to make a pilot Harbeth-specific 'exercises you can do at home with almost zero equipment, perhaps seated, listening, as we tone our rippling lallies ...'.

And now we have diet considerations to add to the get-fit regime. She writes 'I was thinking of a weekly food challenge for the HUG ... for instance, this week's challenge ... no tea or coffee only champagne. No protein other than caviare and Aberdeen Angus steak .... no fruit other than Smoothies .... what do you think?'

I think yes, yes, yes! That's what I call looking after yourself! What do you think?

P.S. Obviously there are members amongst us who are not as mobile as they would wish through ill health. Our challenge to all member is that Victoria believes that not only can she easily maintain the '365 day project' with one new invented exercise every day, but that she can invent special exercises to get the best out of every physical limitation. Just ask.

jplaurel
24-10-2011, 09:28 PM
To turn the title of this thread around - it should be: Physical exercise - you do need it and (if possible) you must get it! It vastly improves your hearing you know.

I amaze myself how little I know about proper diet. Last week at the gym, I was given a severe ticking-off about the evils of Lucozade, a product promoted to people 'into' exercise. I had no idea that 50% or more of a small bottles content is sugar and by weight that amounts to over twenty of those one-shot sugar sticks used for restaurant coffee. That's a hell of a lot of sugar!


Yep, exercise is one of the best audio "tweaks" you can get.

The doctors at my gym created a series of videos that only play when you're sitting on a recumbent bike pedalling away. After a while you start to internalize the information without trying. One of the videos shows the amount of sugar in an ordinary soda. A can of Soda has something like cup of sugar in it! You'd never think about eating that much sugar out of the bowl, but plenty of people drink several soft drinks every day. They also show various fast foods side by side with beakers filled with an equivalent of gelatinous fat. After that, every time you see a cheeseburger, you see the beaker of fat in your mind.

The videos are very effective and apart from being informative, seem to also operate at a subconscious level.

A.S.
26-10-2011, 10:12 AM
...I amaze myself how little I know about proper diet....I was of course joking about a diet of champagne and caviare. But there is a very serious point made in the 'daily fitness' blog concerning diet. I hadn't really appreciated it until a few days ago, but we (westerners, incl. me) do eat a lot of processed food muck.

To take one example, white bread. Now I thought I was eating rather well when most days I'd eat a couple of seeded (white) bread rolls for lunch. The seeds scattered on the top of the rolls gave the impression of healthy eating. But according to health-trainer Victoria, this is an illusion; white bread is junk food. In audio terms I've fallen for the very same psychological trick of a meagre, thin copper core covered with a beautiful sheath: the functional heart is rotten.

So her challenge this week has been to observe just how much processed food we eat. Now this may be just a western problem - I can't imagine Chinese or Japanese fill themselves with processed rubbish - but try it yourself. As you pick-up that tasty, attractively packed treat in the supermarket ask yourself how much processing has it undergone. If, like me, you can begin to appreciate yourself as a victim of food marketing (which knows all the pathways to the pleasure centres in the brain) then maybe we can rebalance our food intake in the interests of overall longer and better health.

Surely the game plan has to be this: an extended old age is only fulfilling when we are in the best possible health which allows us to enjoy music even when our other senses have significantly faded. We, and we alone - not the government, neighbours, friends and family - are responsible for the quality and quantity of nutrients we absorb. We surely must take personal responsibility for what we consume.

So, the watchword is ..... closely monitor how much processed food you eat! Simple as that: no need to worry about the nutritional small print on the package - just classify the foodstuff as processed or not. It's really rather shocking.

kittykat
26-10-2011, 01:47 PM
Now this may be just a western problem - .

Our bodies take longer to break down complex, less refined food, drip feeding energy off it more evenly than getting a quick hit from say white bread (versus wholemeal). We burn through processed food quickly and it sets off the cycle of munching in between meals and not eating well when we should be. Sugars are the ultimate refined carbs and the worrying thing is that its hidden in a lot of things we take for granted eg. Mayonnaise, muesli bars etc.

Food in East Asia (and South East Asia) is probably not best examples of nutrition in my opinion. Being originally poor, carbohydrates were the main component, made delectable with salt, oil, frying or condiments (containing any of those). Japanese diet in general, in my opinion, can really be very unhealthy. Depending on the region, its tends to be overly salty or fatty (penchant for marbled beef cooked in butter for example). Chinese diets are also patchy, being very oily and fat in Beijing and salty in the south. Think the major positive take outs [take aways] from Asia is green leafy vegetables, tofu, soups (in one form becoming the iconic “Brands essence of chicken”).

Rice is actually not very healthy compared with potatoes. Rice is too refined. Spuds have more fibre and are more complex.

Think healthy eating really is personal conscious choice and determination, not unique to any culture.

harbethpr
18-12-2011, 10:17 AM
Being fitter means listening better! Or so we believe! Doing some exercise is better than doing nothing at all. Do yourself a favour* and start and end the day with a really good stretch. Make it your New Year's Resolution!

We present the first of a series of videos made by Victoria, our local professional physical trainer and tailored to the needs of audiophiles, even sitting and listening.

*Please check with your doctor or medical professional before undertaking any exercise.

NOTE: This seasonal video has been replaced with a general version - please refer to post #39 for the all-year-long exercise-with-me video. (http://www.harbeth.co.uk/usergroup/showthread.php?1373-Physical-exercise-do-you-need-it-and-do-you-get-it-!&p=17197#post17197)

A.S.
31-12-2011, 08:40 PM
... or so I am told. That combined with a reddened face evidencing blood actually flowing and temporarily out of breath So, if you are going to make a New Year resolution to invest not only in your music but your own body, do consider this point!

Obviously I am not a medical professional, merely someone who has belatedly discovered that during the years 11-18, I really should not have been skiving PE to get all excited about Leak Stereo 30s, Quad 11s and home made speakers ... I should have been out on the rugby pitch being a real man! Incredibly now that PE is considered core curriculum, only twice in the seven years was I stopped by the PE master in the corridor who asked me 'do I know you boy?'. I can't remember what old flannel I gave him, but he left me alone for years round the back of the bike sheds with HiFi News. What a fool I was! Oh well, it's never too late!

/library/movies_hug/31 Dec B.mov

My personal resolutions for 2012 are ....


Drink more pure water every day (like most people I do not drink enough water)
Eat more fresh fruit every day
Do some simple stretching exercises every day at least once (see post #33)


The healthier I am the better job I can do for you. The healthier you are the better your hearing and the more speakers we sell! A symbiotic relationship for our mutual benefit. The cost is zero.

HUG-1
05-01-2012, 10:48 PM
Much though we really appreciate the investment you make in Harbeth speakers, don't forget a little investment in yourself.

The Christmas special is now ready to be replaced. We are starting on the journey with simple steps to greater health. The Green Tea special is coming soon.

Watch this space. Videos in the can and for upload in next few days.

Thanos
16-01-2012, 07:09 AM
Well done and said Alan! Wishing You All a Happy and Peaceful New Year from Greece! Watch out everybody, Your Health is everything You have! Take care of it, on a daily basis.

In this small corner of the world, at least we have increased our physical condition due to the ...crisis! Never before have I seen so many bicycles in the streets! Expensive meat has been vastly replaced by legumes, which are far better than any meat as they contain high value vegetable proteins. And, of course, less drinking and smoking.

As Alan says, remember fruits! And a tiny piece of advice: Eat them, don't squeeze them, I mean especially the citrous fruits. For example, there is much more vitamin C concentrated in the white section of the flesh of an orange, just underneath its orange skin, than in all the rest of its body. Try to replace any kind of butter used in cooking with raw olive oil, that's a very Greek advice, even though I see contemporary Greeks haning forgotten their parents advice...

And do listen to more music instead of watching TV. It's been more than two years now that we were watching the TV news here, always referring to financial measures and problems. Always about money and recession... Now, that's enough! Turn it off, I'm going to listen to what my SHL5s say...

Warmest regards from Athens,
Thanos

STHLS5
18-01-2012, 02:12 PM
For the past 17 years, I have been without any form of PE. But thanks to this thread, I just started my favorite sport - badminton. *Just realized I am no longer young and right now nursing my swollen wrist and aching ankle but I breath better and the desire to smoke lessens.*

Thank you Harbeth. You managed to cajole me to do something that my wife been trying for years. Maybe, the video clips did the trick. :)

ST

{Moderator's comment: Fantastic news! Well done. That first step is a gigantic one from the sweet spot to the sweat spot. (That's rather neat). More videos made and will be uploaded very soon. Keep watching! Victoria will be delighted when Alan tells her tomorrow; she collects reformed souls.}

keithwwk
18-01-2012, 03:50 PM
I am too doing far lesser Physical Exercise than necessary in my age.

I like to play badminton as well but due to it being a group PE, not easy to keep it going. But, now together with my wife, we are attending an elementry yoga class once a week and it is really good. For almost 2 months, I am able to perform some simple yoga while listening to my Harbeth, either sitting on the sweet spot or stand on floor. My main issue is frozen muscles on my left shoulder. Now my shoulder is much better with relaxed muscle. I also realised my lower back muscle seem stronger now I am able me to sit, stand and walk with spine straight up without feeling tired.

Very happy and music seem become nicer too.

gdbd59
19-01-2012, 10:35 PM
For those more interested in sport than just pure exercise, I can recommend tennis. I took it up aged 45. I had never considered it......most people think of Federer/Nadal/Murray etc charging round a singles court if "tennis" is mentioned.

Most clubs have a significant number of middle-aged members & they play doubles most of the time, far less strenuous. Played to a good standard it can still be a fast game, working the body hard, but most people are 'social' players, some playing into their 80's.....

HUG-1
31-01-2012, 09:21 PM
Article in The Independent about consuming processed meat.

STHLS5
04-02-2012, 06:47 AM
?...*Just realized I am no longer young and right now nursing my swollen wrist and aching ankle . :)
.}
*

Just a reminder to those who want to go back active after a long break. You have to build you strength slowly and do not think you are still in your youths. I just spend another two hours of badminton yesterday night and I have aggravated my injuries which I suffered two weeks ago.What should have been healed within 3 or 4 days is now taking more than two weeks to heal. Time to face the reality - I am getting old and way past my prime.

ST

EricW
04-02-2012, 07:35 PM
*

Just a reminder to those who want to go back active after a long break. You have to build you strength slowly and do not think you are still in your youths. I just spend another two hours of badminton yesterday night and I have aggravated my injuries which I suffered two weeks ago.What should have been healed within 3 or 4 days is now taking more than two weeks to heal. Time to face the reality - I am getting old and way past my prime.

ST

Time takes its toll but no one should let that dissuade them from proper exercise. Done properly, I find that it actually alleviates some of the creakiness and aches and pains associated with ageing, as it keeps your joints, muscles and tissues healthy. Not to mention your mind.

Sports like badminton, or indeed any sport requiring very quick and sudden movements, are just asking for trouble in my view. They may be fun but the nature of the sudden extreme movements is such that you run greater risk of injury, certainly if you don't do a long and careful warmup with lots of stretching, and perhaps even if you do. But there are plenty of other options: walking, running, swimming, yoga, pilates, etc. Or, if you're going to do something that requires very quick, sudden movement, warm up properly. That's always a good idea, but really critical as you get older.

EricW
09-02-2012, 03:45 PM
Don't forget! A few minutes of exercise every will make a difference to your overall health.



For those interested, here's a fascinating recent article from the New York Times explaining some new research into one reason exercise is so beneficial:

http://nyti.ms/yXbdDj

A.S.
17-02-2012, 11:08 PM
The Heart Attack Grill, Las Vegas (where else), home of the health life style, as reported on BBC Radio 4's PM programme, 16 February 2012.

/library/mp3files/The_Heart_Attack_Grill.mp3

I'm speechless.

thurston
21-02-2012, 02:05 PM
I always had problems with gyms, therefore...

...my suggestion for a great workout-machine:

Get yourself a dog!
(if you life in a rural area)

My "workout" is that I walk at least 1 hour a day trough the woods.
No matter what weather, rain, snow or beautiful sunshine.

In addition I play tennis once or twice a week and my uncle (because he made me remember our marathon-time) persuaded me to run at least a half-marathon in june. So I sometimes just go out jogging. But that, to tell the truth, will probably be more often when the days are longer.

Kumar Kane
07-05-2012, 09:13 AM
An update after 3 months of restarting exercise and sensible eating.

After allowing myself to run to seed physically for some years - and being aware of, but carefully ignoring this thread! - I started on the journey to regain my body exactly three months ago, from a bodyweight of 105 kilos. Which, for 6ft, is obese.

At 53, I had to be careful to temper my usual enthusiasm for this, not very successfully. The usual resultant aches, pains and some minor injuries, but it is good to be now down to 89 kilos. Still have a few kilos to go, but the challenge now is maintenance. The most difficult part, I find.

On the exercise front, weights and running/swimming. And sensible eating of the right kind. With zero alcohol.

For those that want to consider weights/strength training seriously, a fascinating place to research is www.startingstrength.com. Lots of testosterone abounds on the site - certainly makes for very entertaining reading. But if one does some culling, there are diamonds to be found.

The other interesting thing looks to be learning how to swim effortlessly. I have been a casual swimmer for years, but more of the thrashing in the water breaststroke kind. I am now trying to learn the front crawl, and it is fascinating to learn that it is as much about balance in the water, and technique to move through the water like fish do, as it is about being fit to swim well. A bit like learning how to ride a bicycle.

{Moderator's comment: more simple exercises-whilst-you-listen will be uploaded in the next few days here on HUG....)