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HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

Since its inception ten years ago, the Harbeth User Group's ambition has been to create a lasting knowledge archive. Knowledge is based on facts and observations. Knowledge is timeless. Knowledge is human independent and replicatable. However, we live in new world where thanks to social media, 'facts' have become flexible and personal. HUG operates in that real world.

HUG has two approaches to contributor's Posts. If you have, like us, a scientific mind and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual area of HUG is for you. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and can be easily understood and tried with negligible technical knowledge.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings sub-forum is you. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters regarding what appears here. That said, very few Posts are rejected. HUG Moderation individually spell and layout checks Posts for clarity but due to the workload, Posts in the Subjective Soundings area, from Oct. 2016 will not be. We regret that but we are unable to accept Posts that present what we consider to be free advertising for products that Harbeth does not make.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Nov. 2016A}
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  • #31
    Putting music first ... elegance in simplicity

    So what am I to do? Do I ditch the £25,000 pre/power which measures worse than a Quad 306? Dump the £6500 SACD player (SACD? Is that another marketing gimmick?) for a £200 machine?

    I could dump the lot and recoup a fair few thousand pounds of my investment. Purchase a sensible, no BS audio system consisting of eg. cheap universal disc player, Quad 34 preamp to match my spare Quad 306 and keep the Harbeth P3ESR of course. Probably exactly what many would suggest I do. But I'd have to train myself to accept it!
    Hey Greg,

    Guess what I've just done?



    Well I never fell for the audiophool BS as hard as you did, but I just found a nice 306 on ebay for £122. :-)

    Completely original, 1986, slight hum - not surprising the PS caps being 26 years old!* But it just sounds so damn good!

    Best advice is to just stop reading the hi-fi comics and restrict your internet browsing to this website... oh and listen to more music, of course.

    New caps ordered from RS, £20.

    Comment


    • #32
      My own music - an escape from mind control

      This thread deals with profound problems not only in audiophilia, but in the whole of the way our economy as laissez-faire capitalism functions, audio being just one subsect of this psycho-socio-political functioning in modern life.

      A major contributor to the predatory nature of capitalism. (even the leader of the opposition has been using that phrase recently, and I believe the P.M.), was the work done by Edward Bernhays, a nephew of Freud, in forming the 'disclipline' of Public Relations. He pioneered the use of the principle in psychology of association, creating certain associations in the minds of the public. He deliberately got them to associate in their minds, the fulfilment of needs, with the fulfilment of wants, the latter being a creatable agenda.

      (I may need a watch to be able to get to work on time, but I might want a bejewelled Omega).

      His work was used directly in the promotion of cigarettes, and he must be responsible for millions of people's disease and deaths, particularly women whom he 'taught' to associate cigarette smoking with independence and liberation. This is a vile and extreme example of the principles in operation.

      I think that as a society we are controlled by certain subsets of the middle class; a layer of colluding advertising specialists psychologists, lawyers and accountants. They are probably in boardrooms as we sit, discussing new approaches to 'programming' us away from our healthy instinctually derived needs, towards created wants. Behaviourism is also now being used extensively for the same purposes.

      One only has to look at TV and observe car advertisements in which the driver is fresh faced and unstressed, there is no traffic on the road, the sun is out, and the satnav is telling the driver that he can have the day off and the boss won't mind, to see the absurdity of the images to which we are subjected. This in an attempt to 'virally' programme us into behaviour patterns.

      (It is also no wonder to me that the playing of violent video games leads to a behaviour devoid of sensibility to the pain in others that violent behaviour causes.)

      This is underpinned by the belief that we live in a "free society", in which we all autonomously can make our own decisions as self determining individuals, based on our own thoughts and beliefs. One can assume that the money spent on TV ads., which cost many {hundreds of} thousands of pounds per minute, is based on a valid investment payback analysis.

      What does this tell us about the individuals who are prey to these forces? That they lack not only self possession, but that they are not scientifically enquiring, and I'm sure that it is no coincidence that we are as a nation poorly scientifically educated.

      Science to me is not a learning of masses of data, but an enquiry in which experiment is designed to test and measure reality, and from that theories formed which can be tested and verified, and with which we can reliably make decisions.
      But in my experience it is taught as a database, and that is political.

      I realised after spending much money on four pairs of a well known company's active speakers, and whose products I admire in many respects incidentally, that I was going round in circles, and had been for years as an audiophile.

      When I changed in '91, from my previous speakers to the first of these, my fellow workers said to me that the sound had worsened, but I could not hear it, and was controlled by internal factors other the perception of sound quality.

      One other thorny issue on the horizon apart from the conning by producing products which are no better, promoting them and wasting the individual's resources, is that we cannot keep on turning the world into a massive rubbish tip of used consumables, accelerated by the tendency, manifest in the Japanese motorcycle industry in the 80s, to produce new 'improved' models every few months.

      I think a major factor in the demise of high end audio, is the promotion of, to say the least, mediocre modern music, this controlled again by powerful marketing men. Why have high quality Hi-Fi when the music is not enhanced by the revealing of subtle nuances by better equipment, when it is not captured in the recording or even in the 'artists' work in the first place?

      So in 'every' home now there is a £150 'midi' system; two beech coloured 'bricks' surrounding a 9" plastic cube which contains a CD player + amplifier + tuner, with the speakers at best 2 feet apart and immediately around it.

      I am heartbroken at the decline of really creative 'pop' for want of a better word, with words which stir up and challenge the emotions and the belief system, some of which from 40 years ago is to me still valid, it containing profound statements, and the substitution of pap and candyfloss performed by people who are preoccupied with their appearance and marketing themselves.

      Will musicians and musicologists be eulogising about current music in 40 years time?

      Although now probably regarded as an old git, that is why I decided to build a studio and try to write some good and poetic music of substance.

      Comment


      • #33
        Individuals must seek the truth for themselves ...

        Originally posted by Pharos View Post
        This thread deals with profound problems not only in audiophilia, but in the whole of the way our economy as laissez-faire capitalism functions, audio being just one subsect of this psycho-socio-political functioning in modern life.

        A major contributor to the predatory nature of capitalism. (even the leader of the opposition has been using that phrase recently, and I believe the P.M.), was the work done by Edward Bernhays, a nephew of Freud, in forming the 'disclipline' of Public Relations. He pioneered the use of the principle in psychology of association, creating certain associations in the minds of the public. He deliberately got them to associate in their minds, the fulfilment of needs, with the fulfilment of wants, the latter being a creatable agenda.

        (I may need a watch to be able to get to work on time, but I might want a bejewelled Omega).

        His work was used directly in the promotion of cigarettes, and he must be responsible for millions of people's disease and deaths, particularly women whom he 'taught' to associate cigarette smoking with independence and liberation. This is a vile and extreme example of the principles in operation.

        I think that as a society we are controlled by certain subsets of the middle class; a layer of colluding advertising specialists psychologists, lawyers and accountants. They are probably in boardrooms as we sit, discussing new approaches to 'programming' us away from our healthy instinctually derived needs, towards created wants. Behaviourism is also now being used extensively for the same purposes.

        One only has to look at TV and observe car advertisements in which the driver is fresh faced and unstressed, there is no traffic on the road, the sun is out, and the satnav is telling the driver that he can have the day off and the boss won't mind, to see the absurdity of the images to which we are subjected. This in an attempt to 'virally' programme us into behaviour patterns.

        (It is also no wonder to me that the playing of violent video games leads to a behaviour devoid of sensibility to the pain in others that violent behaviour causes.)

        This is underpinned by the belief that we live in a "free society", in which we all autonomously can make our own decisions as self determining individuals, based on our own thoughts and beliefs. One can assume that the money spent on TV ads., which cost many {hundreds of} thousands of pounds per minute, is based on a valid investment payback analysis.

        What does this tell us about the individuals who are prey to these forces? That they lack not only self possession, but that they are not scientifically enquiring, and I'm sure that it is no coincidence that we are as a nation poorly scientifically educated.

        Science to me is not a learning of masses of data, but an enquiry in which experiment is designed to test and measure reality, and from that theories formed which can be tested and verified, and with which we can reliably make decisions.
        But in my experience it is taught as a database, and that is political.

        I realised after spending much money on four pairs of a well known company's active speakers, and whose products I admire in many respects incidentally, that I was going round in circles, and had been for years as an audiophile.

        When I changed in '91, from my previous speakers to the first of these, my fellow workers said to me that the sound had worsened, but I could not hear it, and was controlled by internal factors other the perception of sound quality.

        One other thorny issue on the horizon apart from the conning by producing products which are no better, promoting them and wasting the individual's resources, is that we cannot keep on turning the world into a massive rubbish tip of used consumables, accelerated by the tendency, manifest in the Japanese motorcycle industry in the 80s, to produce new 'improved' models every few months.

        I think a major factor in the demise of high end audio, is the promotion of, to say the least, mediocre modern music, this controlled again by powerful marketing men. Why have high quality Hi-Fi when the music is not enhanced by the revealing of subtle nuances by better equipment, when it is not captured in the recording or even in the 'artists' work in the first place?

        So in 'every' home now there is a £150 'midi' system; two beech coloured 'bricks' surrounding a 9" plastic cube which contains a CD player + amplifier + tuner, with the speakers at best 2 feet apart and immediately around it.

        I am heartbroken at the decline of really creative 'pop' for want of a better word, with words which stir up and challenge the emotions and the belief system, some of which from 40 years ago is to me still valid, it containing profound statements, and the substitution of pap and candyfloss performed by people who are preoccupied with their appearance and marketing themselves.

        Will musicians and musicologists be eulogising about current music in 40 years time?

        Although now probably regarded as an old git, that is why I decided to build a studio and try to write some good and poetic music of substance.
        Perhaps you should put away any sharp objects that are within reach...while I tend to agree that we can be suckered in by marketing, I don't believe that things are as bad as you may be describing them.

        Without marketing, you would not know about Harbeths, and then you would not be listening to music that helps work at a deeper level. We all have a mind, and really, it is up to us as individuals to seek truth, if what we see and hear bothers us...hype is hype, and we as emotional creatures have a tendency to want to believe the hype...that's just human nature....now, back to listening to my Harbeths....;-)

        George

        Comment


        • #34
          Obsessiveness and fantasy

          George:

          Personally, I think you are making too light of a serious issue ... of course, it's up to each of us to seek (and hopefully even find) the truth, whatever that may mean in a particular context. But that's a difficult task even without all the obstacles that the modern industries of media, politics and public relations put in our ways. If you can slough it off, then more power to you. But many people are extremely powerfully affected by it.

          Case in point: for a long time after the tragedy of 9/11, a majority of Americans believed (and possibly still do, for all I know) that some or all of the hijackers came across the border from Canada, even though in fact none of them did. This kind of thing has real consequences. The same with the obsessiveness that people develop about various consumerist fantasies - this is not consequence-free either.

          There is an old Zen expression about the limitations of language, equating it to a finger pointing at the moon. The trick with consumerism and other forms of manipulation is to get people obsessed about the finger. The beauty of Harbeth is that it's more about the moon.

          Comment


          • #35
            Rows of shiny sweets within reach ...

            Perhaps you should put away any sharp objects that are within reach...while I tend to agree that we can be suckered in by marketing, I don't believe that things are as bad as you may be describing them.
            "Without marketing, you would not know about Harbeths, and then you would not be listening to music that helps work at a deeper level. We all have a mind, and really, it is up to us as individuals to seek truth, if what we see and hear bothers us...hype is hype, and we as emotional creatures have a tendency to want to believe the hype...that's just human nature....now, back to listening to my Harbeths....
            ;-)
            My stance is not one of personal despair or depression as perhaps you are implying, but more concern at the philosophical nature of the situation; predatory persecutor, and victim.
            Many people's lives are such that they do not have the time or energy to think about their lives, the decisions they are making, and where they will lead. Not everyone has a good start in life, promoted by nurturing parents who guide with the interests of the progeny placed in a position of primacy, and many struggle to even survive.

            If we had the knowledge and insight into human nature which the years give us, providing that we have paid attention to reality and grown, at an earlier age, we probably would have more autonomous personalities at an early age, and hence be more able to sort out the wheat from the chaff and produce a better life for ourselves.

            "Without marketing you would not know about Harbeths"
            ??
            It is said that Rolls Royce do not advertise, and I have never seen one for their products, they sell themselves because they are so well built, and a seeker of well built cars will probably consider them without coercion.

            I would, as you say "by seeking truth", also search out sound equipment for myself, this borne of my internally based interest in sound, and not prompted by some promotional material. Dry specifications would suffice, and indeed be preferable to the ubiquitous exaggeration and hype, so often encountered.

            I do not believe that we as human beings have a tendency to believe hype any more than other forms of communication, except that it is often 'loud' in nature, and the undeveloped self, which is more pronounced in the trusting child, tends to grasp at things with little thought. I regret much of my early decision making, and have just remembered the rows of coloured sweets at the local supermarket checkout, designed to cause the nagging of parents by their children.

            My intensity of concern is a response to the victimisation of those with little power to see or to gain insight into what is being done to them. My Mother smoked herself to death.

            Comment


            • #36
              Delivering the fantasy

              Originally posted by Pharos View Post
              ...I would, as you say "by seeking truth", also search out sound equipment for myself, this borne of my internally based interest in sound, and not prompted by some promotional material. Dry specifications would suffice, and indeed be preferable to the ubiquitous exaggeration and hype, so often encountered....
              As an industry insider, it never ceases to amaze me how the marketing people are able to create ever newer hyperbole to attract the consumer's attention (step 1), pique his curiosity (step 2), motivate him to go and seek out the product (step 3) and buy it (step 4). Nothing wrong with that providing the fantasy is actually delivered, and today's global business model (and I know of no real alternative) generates the financial glue that holds society together, pays for our schools and hospitals and pensions.

              The secret of being a satisfied consumer is of being simultaneously a peripheral purchasing cog in the economic machine yet not being at the heart of the engine. What's needed is personal objectivity. That is, standing outside the car showroom window and observing the beautiful creations therein, but peering into your own brain and watching the thought processes running round leading to some propensity for action. I'd expect that few could view a shiny new car without visualising themselves in it, driving at speed in empty roads with a beautiful and admiring passenger, the envy of all. That is the marketing slant*. Naturally, that is precisely the fantasy that the trained salesman would promote - he merely reinforces the would-be consumers preconceptions - but he knows, and we know that the roads are choked, the depreciation is horrendous, the running costs crippling and finding that beautiful passenger isn't a given. The fantasy from outside the showroom is not deliverable but the illusion is so strongly embedded in the consumer's mind that he ceases to be rational. There is no better example than the Marlborough cowboy.

              All it takes is for the consumer to ask himself this: is the marketing prose likely to be supported by scientific fact or is it (as it mostly is) written or spoken with the tongue very firmly in the cheek? That means, is the marketing sweet-talk intended to be taken literally, or is it a joke presented as a fact. When XYZ Corporation run an advertising campaign saying that their motor oil will 'make your car drive like new' they don't literally mean that (although that's how they want the average consumer to interpret it). If ABC Audio Equipment company says that 'this room tuning device will blow the walls away giving you total reality at home' they are just pulling your leg. Obviously they don't literally (or even metaphorically) mean that; that's the shorthand language of marketing. That's what's known in the trade as a 'tease' - no different from the Seven Veils in intention.

              *Take a look at TV adverts for new cars. Almost universal ingredients - 1) empty roads, no other vehicles 2) wide open spaces 3) clean, fresh, garbage-free, well lit, safe environments 4) sunshine, blue skies and never rain, flood or mud 5) sparkly new car ex-showroom with waxed wheels never to look like that again 6) exciting photographic angles enhancing vision of independence and freedom 7) audio/video/satnav system playing stimulating music 8) well dressed driver and passenger, handsome young professionals ) no parking limitations 10) travel at your own speed 11) no police or emergency service vehicles 12) no traffic lights, roadworks or breakdowns 13) engine performance far in excess of what is legally permitted or usable 14) no mention of running costs and so on. It all adds up to a completely undeliverable fantasy.
              Alan A. Shaw
              Designer, owner
              Harbeth Audio UK

              Comment


              • #37
                Quick, easy answers

                ??
                It is said that Rolls Royce do not advertise, and I have never seen one for their products, they sell themselves because they are so well built, and a seeker of well built cars will probably consider them without coercion.

                This was David Ogilvy’s all time famous headline to market Rolls Royce Cars which reads as "At 60 miles an hour the loudest noise in this new Rolls-Royce comes from the electric clock".
                http://www.mediatrips.com/famous-adv...rtisement.html

                One always had to advertise their product to get it noticed; some things have gotten a marquee name whereby others now do the advertising for them (movies, commentary, forums, etc).

                And two quotes that seem to reflect the view of selling from both sides:

                "There's a sucker born every minute" and
                "Snake Oil salesman"

                Sadly, as noted , most people would like to believe what they hear because they want a quick easy answer or solution to their problems... Is advertising coercion?

                Comment


                • #38
                  The quick fix, healthcare and speaker cones

                  "Sadly, as noted , most people would like to believe what they hear because they want a quick easy answer or solution to their problems..."

                  That is very true, and the concept of comfort zone is entirely consistent with this tendency.

                  Related;
                  "A man convinced against his will, is of the same opinion still". Blake I think.
                  "The naked truth is still taboo wherever it can be seen" Dylan.

                  I am a health food consumer, and have been since about '75, and often chat with the proprietor of our local health food shop. He says that many people who have lived their lives poorly from a health perspective; take little exercise, smoke, eat poor diets, and use their brains little, expect to be able to go to the health shop and just buy a pill which they take regularly which will undo all of the years of poor living. Easy quick fix.

                  Perhaps more contentiously, I believe that many of the belief systems of much of the population are erroneous and fantasy based. Further, an important factor sought by by those in power when employing people to interact with the public, is that the chosen do not have radical views of what is true, and resultantly which may disturb the public's comfort zone.

                  Look at what was done to Galileo for revealing his new truth.

                  I seem to remember that a few years ago we were urged to glue tiny strips of aluminium foil onto our speaker cones to 'improve the sound'.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re-educating is self-war

                    I seem to remember that a few years ago we were urged to glue tiny strips of aluminium foil onto our speaker cones to 'improve the sound'.
                    "Modern armed forces use chaff (in naval applications, for instance, using short-range SRBOC rockets) to distract radar-guided missiles from their targets"... I am sure that the idea was to distract unwanted sound...

                    I think you hit the nail on the head with the idea of the disturbing the public's comfort zone; having one's beliefs challenged is akin to declaring war on the person themselves!

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I am a poet but didn't know it ....

                      Is it possible that monthly consumer electronic magazines are actually written by computers not humans? Flicking through one of these today, I am convinced that the highly polished prose is just too smooth to be the product of hard pressed, deadline oriented journalists. Could consumer electronic reviews be written entirely by computer?

                      Yesterday at poet William Wordsworth's home, there was a poetry-writing kit for sale. It comprised fridge-magnets onto which were printed words which a budding poet could combine into 'poetry'. I've never written poetry before, but in just a few minutes I concocted from the word pool what superficially read like poetry as it warmed the heart. The true meaning - there wasn't any - was entirely suppressed by the structure.

                      It must be possible then to devise rules which string words together into readable prose. After all, how big a vocabulary pool do you actually need to critique consumer electronics?
                      Alan A. Shaw
                      Designer, owner
                      Harbeth Audio UK

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Gramma real bad

                        Definitely not written by computers, as the grammar and spelling are appalling !!!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Reviewing unaffordable exotic audio equipment ....

                          I gave up receiving HFN in 2005, even though a wealthy and kind friend had bought me several years' consecutive subscription.
                          This was due to my then feeling an increasing sense of the tedium whilst reading it, caused by what I feel to be its increasingly vacuous nature, and also of audio magazines in general.

                          My memory of reading such in the 70s was not only of scientifically rigorous reviewing, but of debates about what was going on, which demanded concentration and analysis, with a selfless pursuit of the art form of music reproduction at the core of the magazine's writers and readers.

                          What seemed to me to be presented in '05 was an increasingly self indulgent platform for a few well known journalists to show off and to flaunt their powerful position; that of listening to very expensive equipment and get paid for it.

                          In particular an American writer who had been to Maine University in youth, would write indulgently about his love of other artefacts, for example expensive watches and cars, and his style I often found obscure to the point of being difficult to read. I felt that I was being stressed into reading irrelevance to my interest, this pressurised by the high cost of the magazine.

                          At about this time, or a few years earlier it was becoming widely thought that the magazines were in the pay of the manufacturers, and hence would avoid bad reviews, and also that the equipment reviewed was very often in a price bracket which precluded most people.

                          What was in evidence though, was that a smooth style was developed by the writers in their image based and egotistical self indulgence for which they were paid.

                          Apparently he sold all his vinyl and equipment and returned to the States a few years ago; perhaps he realised that the circus of reviewing never ending models which the manufacturers produced, thus priming the consumer pump, was over.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Writing for and from the heart (and car repairs)

                            Originally posted by Pharos View Post
                            ... My memory of reading such in the 70s was not only of scientifically rigorous reviewing, but of debates about what was going on, which demanded concentration and analysis, with a selfless pursuit of the art form of music reproduction at the core of the magazine's writers and readers.

                            What seemed to me to be presented in '05 was an increasingly self indulgent platform for a few well known journalists to show off and to flaunt their powerful position; that of listening to very expensive equipment and get paid for it...
                            The life of any journalist is not a simple one. The pressure generate a decent living, to write publishable prose on time and to the word count required and in a style appropriate for the magazine is not a task any of us would take on lightly. It's one thing reading a novel on holiday, quite another writing one, and yet another to write with one eye on the clock.

                            Yes, there has been a huge shift in presentational style between the audio magazines of the 1970s (I have many of them) and those today. I recently skimmed a current (July 2012) consumer electronics magazine and I read a review something like this ....

                            ... Opening the carton sent a shiver of sensuous delight down my spine to my trembling fingers. I could hardly restrain my excitement as I unpeeled the clinging cotton inner wrapping revealing the naked beauty of the satin-finished body. I had to take catch my breath as I stroked the controls, the barely raised buttons inviting a deep investigation of the multi-faceted personality of the inner workings... when I nuzzled part A up against part B the sheer magic of this design flowed ...
                            Now that's very sensual writing - vaguely erotic - and it appeals to us on a very deep emotional level. It bypasses our rational, logical brain and goes straight to the core where it creates strong motivational associations. Nothing wrong with that of course. The issue is that it is a very broad, crude and imprecise way to evaluate a technical product, and assumes that we all respond to base nature in a similar way, which may well be true! Logically then, a manufacturer assessing the positive media attention the design, packaging and presentation of his product receives would be encouraged to divert more money into those external touch-feely features, and if necessary pare down the engineering core to the bone, keeping the overall cost the same. Since manufacturers don't meet their end consumers (this HUG is an exception) they assume, rightly or wrongly, that journalists speak for the public at large. That's surely reasonable, since by implication if they didn't, the (printed) magazines would fail through lack of sales. And that is not what we see - generally speaking the mainstream "Which?" type magazines are doing well. So those journalists we read must be writing in a style that the public will pay for.

                            My car is serviced by a little local garage run by a very gifted mechanic. The premises are not impressive, but he is. Sometimes if I'm passing I call in for a chat just to see what his latest challenge is. I usually find him under a car and have to insist that he just carries on, not hauls himself out to greet me. He seems to specialise in one particular central-European made small hatchback, now in its fifth or sixth generation. Its TV advertising has evolved to lifestyle orientation compared with its utilitarian beginnings. He has serviced and repaired every generation of the car during its 20+ year product life span. His opinion of the build quality of the later generations compared with the earlier ones is scathing and has pointed out parts that used to be metal and are now nylon, parts that fail more frequently due presumably to cost-down initiatives, and layer upon layer of added complexity - especially electrical - which are doomed to fail.

                            Wherever you look you see weight reduction, material substitution, reduced durability, cosmetic enhancements and needless or rarely used features added to consumer products. Is it any wonder that the media merely reflect changes in consumer purchasing behaviour? Or do they lead it?

                            Want to try your hand at being a journalist for an hour to see just how difficult it is to be a critic? Try writing no less than 300 words about your TV here ..... all submissions will be published. I've just mulled this over and realised that a) I can't/mustn't disassemble the TV to see what's inside b) I wouldn't be able to recognise any of the chip function blocks even if I did c) I could never design a modern TV so I have no basic skills to be able to critique someone else's design d) I would have to write entirely about the externals. And that is precisely what we see in contemporary reviews: a total focus on the outside not the inside.

                            Go ahead - try it!
                            Alan A. Shaw
                            Designer, owner
                            Harbeth Audio UK

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Worthless audio pulp

                              At one time I wrote for all the UK magazines, most now sadly have disappeared. I found that writing articles and reviews was easy, the only minor pressures were to stick to deadlines and to (occasionally) adhere to a strict, tight word count. It was far easier to write several pages than to be informative and at the same time, concise.

                              Unfortunately, the mags have agenda hidden from the buying public which, to me, makes them nothing more than a tool for certain manufacturers and advertisers. Personally, I don't trust anything I read in the mags, not even the prices which are often wrong. I receive free copies of a few mags each month and these I skip through, sometimes attacking them in anger with my red pen. After this onslaught they are relegated to the recycling bin - I no longer keep them filed for reference.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Pay-off oh la la

                                It's easy to be suspicious about business practices these days what with likes of Murdoch Inc., Barclays Diamond and JP Morgan Dimon and on and on. Once again - How much on exit for Mr. Jerry de Missier?

                                Comment

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