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HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

The Harbeth User Group is the primary channel for public communication with Harbeth's HQ. If you have a 'scientific mind' and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - audio equipment decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual Science of Audio sub-forum area of HUG is your place. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and should be accessible to non-experts and able to be tried-out at home without deep technical knowledge. From a design perspective, today's award winning Harbeths could not have been designed any other way.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings area is you. If you are quite set in your subjectivity, then HUG is likely to be a bit too fact based for you, as many of the contributors have maximised their pleasure in home music reproduction by allowing their head to rule their heart. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area only, although HUG is really not the best place to have these sort of purely subjective airings.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters and Harbeth does not necessarily agree with the contents of any member contributions, especially in the Subjective Soundings area, and has no control over external content.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Oct. 2017}
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BBC article "Musician sues Royal Opera House over ruined hearing"

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  • BBC article "Musician sues Royal Opera House over ruined hearing"

    Hi,

    Generally a lurker in the HUG but thought this article of interest.

    In court documents seen by the BBC, Goldscheider claims that in 2012 his hearing was "irreversibly damaged" during rehearsals of Richard Wagner's thunderous Die Walkure "from brass instruments placed immediately behind him" in the famous "pit" at the Royal Opera House.

    The sound peaked at around 137 decibels, which is roughly the sound of a jet engine. The court documents say the noise "created an immediate and permanent traumatic threshold shift".
    I would imagine its difficult to exactly pinpoint when hearing loss happens but sounds like he has a very valid point if there really are 137dB peaks!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-35938704

  • #2
    Acoustic shock

    I've read of a similar incident where the principal cellist of a major symphony played a pops concert with 7 monitor speakers (for the singers) on the stage. One speaker was only 2 feet from her position and couldn't be moved. She experienced acoustic shock which ended her performing career.

    Apparently acoustic shock is not so much losing one's hearing, as having it damaged to the extent that even small sounds can be intolerable. The amount of sound produced by today's orchestras is a real problem for players. Orchestras play louder and instruments are designed to produce more sound, than ever before, I believe.

    Ear protection is mandatory when sitting in certain sections of the orchestra, but when sound levels reach 130+ decibels, even that may not be sufficient to prevent problems for players.

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