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HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

Since its inception ten years ago, the Harbeth User Group's ambition has been to create a lasting knowledge archive. Knowledge is based on facts and observations. Knowledge is timeless. Knowledge is human independent and replicatable. However, we live in new world where thanks to social media, 'facts' have become flexible and personal. HUG operates in that real world.

HUG has two approaches to contributor's Posts. If you have, like us, a scientific mind and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual area of HUG is for you. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and can be easily understood and tried with negligible technical knowledge.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings sub-forum is you. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters regarding what appears here. That said, very few Posts are rejected. HUG Moderation individually spell and layout checks Posts for clarity but due to the workload, Posts in the Subjective Soundings area, from Oct. 2016 will not be. We regret that but we are unable to accept Posts that present what we consider to be free advertising for products that Harbeth does not make.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Nov. 2016A}
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We may need MRI scan after all - audio nervosa

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  • #91
    Originally posted by yeecn View Post
    ... But the human body is basically an electro-chemical system. So it is possible that the high frequency sound can be absorbed by the various glans or organs...
    That sounds OK at first, but we know that the skin is reflective at audio frequencies and only up in the infra-red range is absorptive, where the wavelength is very short and can penetrate the skin - hence sunburn.

    If the high audio frequencies bounce off the skin, which organ or organs are detecting them?

    We know that even the very thin and porous grille cloth can and does effect the tweeter output at even 15kHz, and would have huge effect at 30kHz. A shirt, with it's completely closed woven structure would pass little through above perhaps 5kHz (a guess), so how a clothed body could be susceptible to super-high frequencies is a complete mystery.
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

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    • #92
      Originally posted by A.S. View Post
      .....I've mentioned before that 35,000 years back (to the first musical instruments) in evolutionary development is a mere click of the fingers. It is as if it were yesterday..
      Did music really evolve as recent as 35000 years ago? Besides humans animals do make music. They must be doing that for millions of years. Birds sing and some birds go through certain ritual like dancing to court the opposite ***. The oldest flute made of bone is said to be 57000 years (or 35000). For humans to reach the sophistication of making flute must be later, i.e., after basic musical instrument such as drums. Why should humans be exception to the general rule? The oldest stone tool factory is 25000000 years old. Can music to be as old as that or as old as life itself? Humans must have heard birds singing millions of years ago and if they bulit factory millions of years ago then wouldn't they have discovered some sort of musical instrument or at least use their voice to repeat songs of the animals? In fact, the birds singing or other sound by howling wolfs may have exposed human to music millions of years ago. And those sound are without the 22khz CD upper limit.

      Originally posted by A.S. View Post
      That sounds OK at first, but we know that the skin is reflective at audio frequencies and only up in the infra-red range is absorptive, where the wavelength is very short and can penetrate the skin - hence sunburn. If the high audio frequencies bounce off the skin, which organ or organs are detecting them?...
      Maybe not the skin but how about hair fiber and hair follicle covering our skin and especially our head over the skull covering the whole brain. I am not sure but did anyone research of those possibilities? Insect uses the tiny hairs to detect vibration.

      ST

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      • #93
        Ok, I'm no anthropologist. I really can't add anythin more here. Whether the first instrument is 35,000 or 75,000 years ago is irrelevant. In our evolutionary development, music is an extrememely recent development and there has been insufficient time for our DNA to significantly adapt to that in perhaps as few as 1000 generations. An enhanced ability to play or hear music does not seem to have offered any irrisistible attractiveness to a mate, so has not been positively selected by evolution. It's as good as it needs to be.

        That's all I have to contribute to this thread.
        Alan A. Shaw
        Designer, owner
        Harbeth Audio UK

        Comment


        • #94
          Originally posted by A.S. View Post
          ..That's all I have to contribute to this thread.
          Thank you very much for your contributions to this thread. It was very informative.

          Regards,
          ST

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