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HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

INTRODUCTION- PLEASE READ FIRST TO UNDERSTAND THIS FORUM!

"This Harbeth User Group (HUG) is the Manufacturer's own managed forum dedicated to natural sound, realisable by controlling the confounding variables between tthe microphone and the listeners' ears.

For example, the design of and interaction between the hifi amplifier and its speaker load can and potentially will alter the sound balance of what you hear. To reproduce the sounds captured by the recording microphones, as Harbeth speakers are designed to do, you would naturally select system components (sources, electronics, cables and so on) that do not color the sound before it reaches the speakers.

Identifying components for their system neutrality should, logically, start with the interpretation and analysis of their technical, objective performance, as any and every deviation from a measurably flat frequency response at any point along the serial chain from microphone to ear is very likely to cause the total system to have an audible sonic personality. That includes the contribution of the listening room itself.

HUG specialises in making complex technical matters simple to understand, aiding the identification of audio components likely to maintain a faithful relationship between the recorded sound and the sound you hear. With our heritage of natural sound, HUG cannot be really be expected to guide in the selection, approval, endorsement or even discussion of equipment that is intend to introduce a significantly personalised sound to the audio signal chain. For that you should do your own research and above all, make the effort to visit an Authorised Dealer and listen to your music at your loudness on your loudspeakers through the various electronics offered there. There is no on-line substitute for that time investment in a dealer's showroom.

If you desire to intentionally tune your system sound to your personal taste, please consider carefully how much you should rely upon the subjective opinions of strangers. Their hearing acuity and taste will be different to yours, as will be their motives and budget, their listening distance, listening loudness and listening room treatment, not necessarily leading to appropriate equipment selection and listening satisfaction for you.

Alternatively, if faithfully reproducing the sound intended by the composer, score, conductor and musicians over your speakers is your audio dream, then understanding something of the issues likely to fulfill that objective is what this forum has been helping with since 2006. Welcome!"


Jan. 2018
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BBC Proms (live)

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  • BBC Proms (live)

    The 2011 season at the Royal Albert Hall, London.
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

  • #2
    Live! BBC Proms, Film Music .... listen in HD sound here live, evening of 12 August 2011 (UK time).
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

    Comment


    • #3
      Keith Lockhart

      I believe Keith Lockhart, Conductor of The Boston Pops performed last night.

      Comment


      • #4
        HD digital - and MAXIMUM VOLUME AT ALL TIMES

        I watched the last night on HD TV via satellite and while the sound balance was excellent (except not enough organ for me) was disappointed by the amount of audio level compression. This was most noticeable during the Britten Young person's guide and in the National anthem arrangement. Quiet passages would be almost swamped by the upward rushing level of background from the ambience in the hall.

        I thought that HD digital was supposed to improve the experience! This obsession with MAXIMUM VOLUME AT ALL TIMES spoils music.
        rant over ;)
        Paul

        "If all else fails, read the instructions"

        Comment


        • #5
          Interesting. Is this broadcast available in the iPlayer? It would be educational to listen to the effect you mention. Links?

          Comment


          • #6
            Limiter pumping action

            Originally posted by HUG-1 View Post
            It would be educational to listen to the effect you mention.
            It is rather odd that a Radio 3 balancer would allow such a situation to persist. Getting caught out once or twice (during a live show as hairy as the "Last Night") is one thing, but long term...? Odd.

            The effect is caused by driving into a limiter set to a longish recovery time - say .5s or more. A limiter set to this configuration is, more or less, a classic automatic gain control. Once the limiter has "attacked" and is reducing the gain by whatever amount it needs to achieve its target level, the idea of a long recovery is that the gain takes a considerable amount of time (the "recovery time") to return to unity after the over-loud input signal has dropped below the threshold point.

            The virtue of a long recovery time is that it reduces the tendency to "pumping" but the quid pro quo is as you describe. Any automatic gain control device needs to be used with exquisite care but devices such as limiters are vital in a live situation, especially when largely unrehearsed.

            Comment


            • #7
              Link to broadcast

              http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b014j7xf (UK only)
              Paul

              "If all else fails, read the instructions"

              Comment


              • #8
                Link

                http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode..._Proms_Part_2/
                This is a UK only feed.

                I'll have a listen to the R3 version which I've also recorded from satellite (for my own personal use only) and report!
                Paul

                "If all else fails, read the instructions"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Digital processing of sound on TV?

                  Point taken Pluto about the standard of R3 balances, which are usually beyond reproach. The squashed sound was only apparent on the TV output, which travels via a different broadcast chain.
                  I hadn't realised that the TV sound chain had an even more enthusiastic limiter than the infamous "optimod" used in my time on BBC Radio, where the excuse for squashing everything to the max was to reach distant FM receivers with enough shout to overcome the background hiss.

                  Digital TV does not need this sort of processing as the receivable dynamic range of the digital broadcast system is vastly superior to FM, and here's no need on TV to overcome in-car background noises so why do they do it? They could easily reduce the "overdrive" by a few dBs for music programmes just as was done for Radio2 specialist music shows in the evenings and on R3 outside of "drivetime".
                  Paul

                  "If all else fails, read the instructions"

                  Comment

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