Announcement

Collapse

HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

INTRODUCTION- PLEASE READ FIRST TO UNDERSTAND THIS FORUM!

"This Harbeth User Group (HUG) is the Manufacturer's own managed forum dedicated to natural sound, realisable by controlling the confounding variables between tthe microphone and the listeners' ears.

For example, the design of and interaction between the hifi amplifier and its speaker load can and potentially will alter the sound balance of what you hear. To reproduce the sounds captured by the recording microphones, as Harbeth speakers are designed to do, you would naturally select system components (sources, electronics, cables and so on) that do not color the sound before it reaches the speakers.

Identifying components for their system neutrality should, logically, start with the interpretation and analysis of their technical, objective performance, as any and every deviation from a measurably flat frequency response at any point along the serial chain from microphone to ear is very likely to cause the total system to have an audible sonic personality. That includes the contribution of the listening room itself.

HUG specialises in making complex technical matters simple to understand, aiding the identification of audio components likely to maintain a faithful relationship between the recorded sound and the sound you hear. With our heritage of natural sound, HUG cannot be really be expected to guide in the selection, approval, endorsement or even discussion of equipment that is intend to introduce a significantly personalised sound to the audio signal chain. For that you should do your own research and above all, make the effort to visit an Authorised Dealer and listen to your music at your loudness on your loudspeakers through the various electronics offered there. There is no on-line substitute for that time investment in a dealer's showroom.

If you desire to intentionally tune your system sound to your personal taste, please consider carefully how much you should rely upon the subjective opinions of strangers. Their hearing acuity and taste will be different to yours, as will be their motives and budget, their listening distance, listening loudness and listening room treatment, not necessarily leading to appropriate equipment selection and listening satisfaction for you.

Alternatively, if faithfully reproducing the sound intended by the composer, score, conductor and musicians over your speakers is your audio dream, then understanding something of the issues likely to fulfill that objective is what this forum has been helping with since 2006. Welcome!"


Jan. 2018
See more
See less

The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

    FLAC format compresses but does not lose data. It is wide spread and you can convert from FLAC back to your original WAV anytime you like, With disk space being cheap and memory getting cheaper this is the way to go,

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

      Originally posted by steve View Post
      FLAC format compresses but does not lose data. It is wide spread and you can convert from FLAC back to your original WAV anytime you like, With disk space being cheap and memory getting cheaper this is the way to go,
      Yes - FLAC is my choice of storage for music. One problem is that almost none of the "MP3" players plays FLAC. In contrast mp3 is ubiquitous - I got it in my mini-combo, mp3 player, car player, DVD player, Western Digital Media Player and PC. Whereas FLAC is only available on my PC and my Western Digital Media Player. It is OK for me now, but I do hope that FLAC (or one of the lossless compression codec) will become more widely supported in the future.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

        When I ripped (almost) my entire CD collection and gave it away, I seriously considered FLAC or Vorbis or one of these lossless encoders. I didn't even consider MP3, not even at a high bitrate. I decided in the end that I'd probably regret coding with an 'enthusiasts' coder in twenty years when it had disappeared and that I should either use MP3 (no) or retain the original WAV files, disk space being cheap.

        So I ripped them all to 44k 16 bit WAV files, the same format they're on the CDs.
        Alan A. Shaw
        Designer, owner
        Harbeth Audio UK

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

          A few years ago I encoded a piece of music using 3 different formats (mp3, ogg, wma) using the highest possible settings (e.g. 320kbs). I then looked at each version of the song using spectral analysis and compared it to the original. I noted that in all three cases information was missing and in some cases it was quite drastic.

          I now encode exclusively to FLAC using XLD on my Mac.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

            hasnt cheap storage negated the need for compression? you can fit 600 uncompressed cds onto a 500gb pocket size drive. all for less than 150 USD's.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

              I just bought a 1Tb hard disk for a little over 60, that's 1000Gb for those not computer literate.

              I rip everything as .wav files.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: The MP3 audio file format: Warning! Do not use for serious audio.

                Alan:

                A thought for you: not sure what you're using as a player, but the iTunes software (which is a free download) will handle WAV files. And if you import your WAV files into iTunes, you will be able to perform very easy conversions (without affecting the original file) to mp3 or AAC at any bit rate you choose. The iTunes "Get Info" command allows you to verify the bit rate of every file, to confirm it's been encoded properly. So while you can't beat WAV for archiving your data, if you're interested in assessing the sonic validity of mp3 (or AAC) at various bit rates, iTunes gives you a very easy and convenient means of doing just that.

                Comment

                Working...
                X