Announcement

Collapse

HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

Since its inception ten years ago, the Harbeth User Group's ambition has been to create a lasting knowledge archive. Knowledge is based on facts and observations. Knowledge is timeless. Knowledge is human independent and replicatable. However, we live in new world where thanks to social media, 'facts' have become flexible and personal. HUG operates in that real world.

HUG has two approaches to contributor's Posts. If you have, like us, a scientific mind and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual area of HUG is for you. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and can be easily understood and tried with negligible technical knowledge.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings sub-forum is you. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters regarding what appears here. That said, very few Posts are rejected. HUG Moderation individually spell and layout checks Posts for clarity but due to the workload, Posts in the Subjective Soundings area, from Oct. 2016 will not be. We regret that but we are unable to accept Posts that present what we consider to be free advertising for products that Harbeth does not make.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Nov. 2016A}
See more
See less

Favourite recordings - your choice ...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Let's start with three LP:

    1) Tortoise, TNT (Thrill Jockey, 050). This Chicago's group has integrated jazz, electronic, rock and more in a intelligent modern way;

    2) Do Make Say Think, Winter Hymn Country Hymn Secret Hymn (Constellation, CST025-1) Toronto's post-rock group made me discover few years ago a new way in music;

    3) Smog, A river ain't to much to love (Drag City, DC292). This low-fi folk always reminds me the forest where I like to spend days with my girlfriend and friends when I have the time to;

    And continue with five more...

    4) Radiohead, Ok Computer (Parlophone-EMI, 7243-8-55229-1-8). Ok... no presentations to do. So representative of the modern world and the passage to the 21st century;

    5) Dave Brubeck, Time Out (Columbia, CS8192). Even after all these years, such a great recording with space and space between all those intruments. Who can resist to Paul Desmond?

    6) Nina Nastasia, The Blackened Air (Touch and Go, TG231). Indy-folk registered by the brilliant Steve Albini. Nina's voice hits me deep in my soul. As years go, I realize how much I like folk music like this;

    7) Kenny Burrell, Midnight Blue (Blue Note, BST-84123). I took me a long time to discover jazz's guitarists but now I know few of them and I really enjoy this late night album;

    8) Dirty Three, Ocean songs (Touch and Go, TG193). The feeling of the deep and blue ocean, right in your ears with this Australian's trio (violin, guitar and drums).

    That's it (for the moment). Oh no! I already miss one:

    9) Pixies, Doolittle (4AD, CAD 905). Even if I was a teenager when the grunge movement arrived, I've just discovered this raw album from College's rock Pixies two years ago. Like we say in French "Il n'est jamais trop tard pour bien faire." After that arrived groups such Nirvana...

    Sebastien

    Comment


    • #77
      Hi Sebastien

      Your selections are frighteningly close to mine! Great choices there, seriously! Some of my favourite recordings ever committed to tape, period.

      "Here comes your man..."

      Originally posted by Sebastien View Post
      Let's start with three LP:

      1) Tortoise, TNT (Thrill Jockey, 050). This Chicago's group has integrated jazz, electronic, rock and more in a intelligent modern way;

      2) Do Make Say Think, Winter Hymn Country Hymn Secret Hymn (Constellation, CST025-1) Toronto's post-rock group made me discover few years ago a new way in music;

      3) Smog, A river ain't to much to love (Drag City, DC292). This low-fi folk always reminds me the forest where I like to spend days with my girlfriend and friends when I have the time to;

      And continue with five more...

      4) Radiohead, Ok Computer (Parlophone-EMI, 7243-8-55229-1-8). Ok... no presentations to do. So representative of the modern world and the passage to the 21st century;

      5) Dave Brubeck, Time Out (Columbia, CS8192). Even after all these years, such a great recording with space and space between all those intruments. Who can resist to Paul Desmond?

      6) Nina Nastasia, The Blackened Air (Touch and Go, TG231). Indy-folk registered by the brilliant Steve Albini. Nina's voice hits me deep in my soul. As years go, I realize how much I like folk music like this;

      7) Kenny Burrell, Midnight Blue (Blue Note, BST-84123). I took me a long time to discover jazz's guitarists but now I know few of them and I really enjoy this late night album;

      8) Dirty Three, Ocean songs (Touch and Go, TG193). The feeling of the deep and blue ocean, right in your ears with this Australian's trio (violin, guitar and drums).

      That's it (for the moment). Oh no! I already miss one:

      9) Pixies, Doolittle (4AD, CAD 905). Even if I was a teenager when the grunge movement arrived, I've just discovered this raw album from College's rock Pixies two years ago. Like we say in French "Il n'est jamais trop tard pour bien faire." After that arrived groups such Nirvana...

      Sebastien

      Comment


      • #78
        Hi timleety,

        I'm glad to hear this. If you have any other recordings that I might like, please feel free to post them here. I guess that a lot of HUG members are willing to discover new musics.

        Sebastien

        Comment


        • #79
          Not sure if anyone uses the http://www.dr.loudness-war.info website but personally find this database quite useful as an initial screener for recording quality. It’s a dynamic range log of cd’s (lossless) and compressed music (lossy)(I’d just ignore the lossy loggings and concentrate on the lossless ones). You can contribute as well by downloading a tool and running a ripped *.wav through it. It will tell you the dynamic range of the product. All things equal, the higher the DR, the less compression and the recording should sound better through your Harbeths. You might also find that you are setting your volume control at a higher level for those recordings with a high dynamic range (to catch the lower level detail). The recordings with a low DR can be a pain not only because they are loud, but difficult to adjust the volume control to for the most comfortable listening level.

          There seems to be some consistency in the database as there are some discs which are logged more than once and the readings are close if not equal. Interestingly some albums released in different years have different readings and generally the more recent the release, the louder they are.

          You can copy the list to an excel sheet and do some funky stats on them. There is a min and max reading for each album, ie. the track with the lowest and highest DR. You can run a Standard deviation on the min and max to get an idea of consistency, all things equal of the total product. I can see why Tubular Bells, Steely Dan come out on top as decent recordings. Pink Floyd albums have some good tracks but there are also some really awfully loud ones. The irritating things about inconsistent albums is that you might find yourself jumping out to lower the volume (after a quiet track).

          Comment


          • #80
            Just a little more on selecting decent recordings. I know most of us buy the music we like, rather than buy what is a good recording. ive however found it useful to be able to put an objective frame of reference on what constitutes a decent CD in a collection.

            1. Using the approach above helps i.e. Evaluating the loudness density. (The TT DR Offline meter software (free download) can give a rough idea of what albums or tracks have good dynamic range (with some limitations which you can read in their userguide)

            2. Another very useful approach which I learnt from this forum (thank you to Alan, yeecn, miniwatt and others) is using a software tool. It’s more dependable than a subjective listen. I find that it’s possible to be more discerning using measurements and data.

            Some examples of albums I ran through a wave editor…

            The Huey Lewis album registers the highest DR, album wise, among the 5, and the lowest dynamic range award no doubt goes to the Roots Manuva album, which graphically is obviously very loud all the way through. Peter Gabriel’s “Scratch my back” looks promising together with Amparo, which however does look clipped off on certain tracks?

            Im not sure if it will be acceptable as consumers to buy an album, evaluate it technically, and if it measures poorly take it back to HMV.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #81
              Deep bass note - what frequency?

              Originally posted by A.S. View Post
              Sir George Martin, the Beatles producer was interviewed recently saying that he has spent two years reworking the original Beatles recordings that he produced from the 1960's for the new 'Love' album. He described these gems as 'the holy grail of music' and explained how he had consulted the remaining Beatles and widows throughout the process and all were delighted with the results.

              I have the Love CD, and the sound is decidedly modern. Out of curiosity I've picked one track - Hey Jude - and performed a spectral analysis of the original 'raw' recording on CD issue with that from the Love album.

              The scale is 12dB/vertical division. To put that into perspective, 6dB is a doubling of sound pressure and 12dB is four times.

              I've drawn a gradient line from an arbitrary frequency point that seems common to both. This downward sloping trend is exactly what you expect for any music averaged over time - the bump at around 8kHz is the cymbal which if you recall, features quite prominently throughout this song so contributes a lot of energy to the top.

              The most interesting thing is the quite different equalised spectral balance in the middle frequencies - with much more energy in the new rework hence the more immediate sound?

              ADDED: Eleanor Rigby. Note that the channel balance is different and the top end has been slightly lifted on the new version (around 5-10kHz).
              Hi Alan,
              1.I do not have much knowledge about wave/spectral analysis but I am interested to be able to identify particular frequencies (bass notes) in a track. Is there a free or affordable software that could do the job? My interest began with the Simon & Garfunkel's Bridge Over Troubled Waters about 3mi 10 sec from the start of the song there is a definite low note that I feel is very satisfying to hear.

              2.Which Harbeth speaker would reproduce that note most faithfully?
              Regards

              Comment


              • #82
                Sonic Visualiser is an excellent for spectrum analysis and much more. It will take a bit of playing around to know how to work the program and how to interpret the graphs/charts.

                You will need to extract the CD into the computer first. Exact Audio Copy is a popular program for that.

                Comment


                • #83
                  Coming back to the primary question.

                  Note: if all the world repeatedly asks the "Island Question", it goes everytime around the music, but in our case the question should be allowed:

                  "Ok, I am now on this island, for some inexplicable reasons I managed to bring 3 LP Album with me. And, OH, what a luck! Behind that palm over there somebody forgot his HiFi System with an Thorens TT, a nice Mcintosh Integrated Amp and some Harbeth Monitor 30. Now that' s where I was lucky things didn't turn out worse! "

                  Now back to the question, which I thought, is heavy to answer, but when I got through my collection there are indeed 3 outstanding Albums:

                  1. The Gary Burton Quintet with Eberhard Weber: Ring (ECM 1974) This Album associates so many things for me: 1. Gary Burton, Eberhard Weber and Pat Metheny are my favourite musicians. 2. I bought this album exactly 30 years ago, when I was 17. I remember listening to it on the couch of my first girlfriend on her Dual Mono TT. This album is almost the only piece of music that went along with me for all the years and I permanently have listened to it.

                  2. Holger Czuckay: On the way to the peak of normal (EMI-Welt Rekord 1981). Great Album by a wonderful artist. People who don't know Holger might be thinking, he is some crazy professor making strange music. But his work over the past decades is simply outstanding. And of course I do know about the huge influence CAN had exerted to generations of young UK and US musicians and bands.

                  3. Genesis: Seconds out (Charisma Records 1977): Difficult to choose, very close vote against any Album by David Sylvian. At least same like Gary Buston: this album I listen for 32 years now permanently. The music of the band without Peter Gabriel but with Gabriel songs. Everything since then was dissapointing. So was the last tour of them. My thought was, they only in it for the money.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Nice movie sound track 30mins only but superb!

                    It is lyrical, rhythmic, rich and full recording.



                    http://www.amazon.com/Mouse-Hunt-Ori.../dp/B000001534
                    "Bath with Music"

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Swing..

                      More I listen, more I love it..

                      Swing is Here album from RR. My wife said "They (my Harbeths) seem happily dancing there!"



                      http://www.amazon.com/Swing-Here-Dic...5678097&sr=1-1
                      "Bath with Music"

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        More jazz but....

                        Classical Jazz that sound very nice if your system's sound is balance enough...



                        http://www.amazon.com/Vivaldi-Four-S...ref=pd_sim_m_5



                        http://www.amazon.com/Jacques-Loussi...6103172&sr=1-9
                        "Bath with Music"

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Some favourite music of mine from 2010. They are, in my opinion, pretty catchy, tuneful and listenable, but not necessarily of good fidelity.

                          CORINNE BAILEY RAE-The Sea- EMI 2010 - l love her voice
                          GORILLAZ- Plastic Beach- EMI Parlophone 2010 - funky
                          JOHNNY CASH - American VI: Ain’t No Grave -American Island Def Jam 2010 - haunting
                          LITTLE BIRDY-Hollywood -Virgin Eleven 2010 - tuneful
                          PAT METHENY-Orchestrion -Nonesuch 516668-2 2010 - entertaining, reasonable quality
                          SADE -Soldier of Love -Sony Epic RCA 2010 - "stylish"
                          THIRSTY MERC -Mousetrap Heart- Warner 2010
                          CHRISTINA AGUILERA- Bionic -Sony RCA 2010 - loud but some really catchy tunes in there...
                          DAVID BYRNE & FATBOY SLIM - Here Lies Live- Nonesuch 2010 - some melodic tunes in there

                          Anyone like to share their favourite 2010 releases?

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Most of my recent purchase are all old release. I think the latest among them is Rattle Brahms full symphonies with Berliner Philharmoniker by EMI which is released in 2009. Good but I personally like Claudio Abbado version more than Rattle.

                            "Bath with Music"

                            Comment


                            • #89


                              A little late, but while we're still in the spirit...

                              A treasure trove of early festive music from 1917 to 1959, it affords the listener a peep-hole into times gone by - like a journey of discovery, much like when radio broadcast first came into play. I can just imagine people sitting in front of their radios, transfixed on whatever programme was being magically beamed into their homes.

                              Some favourites like Lightnin' Hopkins, Bessie Smith and Leadbelly are here, along with some delightful surprises like Fiddlin' John Carson & His Virginia Reelers, Walter Davis, Vera Hall Ward and the Cotton Top Mountain Sanctified Singers.

                              May not be suited for all, given the rudimentary recordings from early days. But I thought this might be an intriguing listen on the Harbeths: they neither flatter nor forgive, but present a very buttery, creamy texture on all the proceedings. Just try playing this through other speakers tuned to today's prevailing *audiophile* tastes; I daresay some results will be rather horrendous. It again highlights the measure of a truly good speaker - its versatility and encompassing nature. Perhaps this could be due to the fact that we are dealing with vocals and acoustic instruments.

                              The disc comes nicely packaged with a mock-period postcard and a little booklet. Without a painstaking project like this (restored from original 78s), most of the musical material may have been lost to us forever.

                              An extract from the booklet:
                              This collection reflects sentiments of earlier times, when the holiday involved more than indoor trees and endless trips to the mall. Our playlist includes Southern fiddles, banjos and choirs, jazz bands and blues singers, and festive music from Puerto Rico, Italy, Ukraine and Trinidad. In the spirit of fairness, we've tried to designate equal time for sacred and secular, for Christ and Santa Claus, and for respectable and rowdy.

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Which Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake is your choice? Just bathe with below albums thru my C7 last Sunday...wonderfull and beaustifull..Ansermet was released in 1959 and Geirgiev was released in 2007..Both sound equally nice.
                                Attached Files
                                Last edited by keithwwk; 24-01-2011, 06:32 AM. Reason: typo errors
                                "Bath with Music"

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X