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Since its inception ten years ago, the Harbeth User Group's ambition has been to create a lasting knowledge archive. Knowledge is based on facts and observations. Knowledge is timeless. Knowledge is human independent and replicatable. However, we live in new world where thanks to social media, 'facts' have become flexible and personal. HUG operates in that real world.

HUG has two approaches to contributor's Posts. If you have, like us, a scientific mind and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual area of HUG is for you. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and can be easily understood and tried with negligible technical knowledge.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings sub-forum is you. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters regarding what appears here. That said, very few Posts are rejected. HUG Moderation individually spell and layout checks Posts for clarity but due to the workload, Posts in the Subjective Soundings area, from Oct. 2016 will not be. We regret that but we are unable to accept Posts that present what we consider to be free advertising for products that Harbeth does not make.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Nov. 2016A}
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Review of P3ESR in Malaysia

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  • Review of P3ESR in Malaysia

    After Alan's visit to Malaysia in May 2010, we have the first review of Harbeth loudspeakers. You can read the review here. It is a well read blog in Malaysia despite you see nil comments. Again the silent majority.

    Readers may want to take note that the reviewer who attended Alan's talk but seemed to disagree on Alan's take on stands and amplifiers. Personally, I think a minimum of 100W for P3ESR is ridiculous.

    ST

  • #2
    British sound?

    To be honest, I found the review rather poor. "British" sound (as opposed to? Asian, American?) and MIT cables (enough said). I think that the reviewer would be more at home with 'high-end' stuff like Krell, Wadia and the likes.

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    • #3
      Reviewers preferences ....

      Yes some people just don't like the so called British sound. The reviewer is just another one of those who goes for quantity rather than quality. And i guess he missed the point on why we like Harbeth so much. Its not just the comfortable under the blanket type of sound as he mentioned. Its much more than that.

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      • #4
        Reviewers preferences ....

        "Warm cosy sound that wraps around you like a comforting blanket" ????? apparently the reviewer has somewhat different expectations.. granted.. after listening to ATC's I think that description might be reasonable. I think many speakers would be considered "cosy" after ATC's.. laff..

        My own pair of P3ESR's in my vinyl lounge rig driven by the humble NAD C162 and C272 sound peppy and full of life.. yet their tonal structure and balance is the equal of my Monitor 30's in my primary rig, just scaled down. Which is as it should be.

        While I gathered that although the reviewer did understand the P3ESR, he didn't really "connect" with it. This is something that is perhaps true of most Harbeths. You either "get it" .. or you don't. Much like the affinity that others develop with other brands, this holds true to the Harbeth "sound" and family line.

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        • #5
          Musicians don't make good judges of sound ...

          [QUOTE=Double D;10334] I think many speakers would be considered "cosy" after ATC's.. laff..

          Hahaha that's a good one...lol....ya i agree that the reviewer didn't get connected with the P3ESR as he should. One thing i can never comprehend & agree is when people say that Harbeths are coloured. Somebody from our local forum (Singapore) stressed several times that he is a professional violinist but yet say that Harbeths are coloured & not accurate when reproducing the sound of violin. He actually prefers to hear his instrument on his highly acclaimed & expensive American spks that is cold, overblown, exaggerated & devoid of any richness, warmth & deep instrumental timbre of the real thing. And he claims to be a professional violinist! Lol....

          {Moderator's comment: not surprising. Remember, he hears his instrument playing at his ear (in the super-nearfield). It sounds horrible - try it yourself. We hear it 10m away when the direct sound is blended with the hall's sound: a completely different and much warmer tone. He won't recognise that as he's conditioned to think that the super-nearfield "is" the sound of the violin. As you suggest, he'll probably be much happier with more 'in your face' speakers. We, the audience, definitely wouldn't be.}

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          • #6
            Musicians

            [QUOTE=Gan CK;10336]
            Originally posted by Double D View Post
            he'll probably be much happier with more 'in your face' speakers. We, the audience, definitely wouldn't be.
            It is known that many violinists (and musicians) have affected hearing. A typical practice session will see 90dB, with 110-115dB peaks. Some musicians wear ear plugs to lessen what could be signs of tinnitus. Yes, listening to an instrument is much more enjoyable, but probably more fun playing it. Anyone who listens to a good loudspeaker like Harbeth knows the music transcends the box, but playing an instrument ensures you are still with and "within it".

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            • #7
              Nearfield, musicians, sonic perspectives

              Originally posted by Gan CK View Post
              {Moderator's comment: not surprising. Remember, he hears his instrument playing at his ear (in the super-nearfield). It sounds horrible - try it yourself. We hear it 10m away when the direct sound is blended with the hall's sound: a completely different and much warmer tone. He won't recognise that as he's conditioned to think that the super-nearfield "is" the sound of the violin. As you suggest, he'll probably be much happier with more 'in your face' speakers. We, the audience, definitely wouldn't be.}
              That's a very apt observation. Thanks for pointing it out. I remembered reading about an interview of Alan some months back, where he says something like "close you eyes and listen to the sound around you, notice how distance they are ...". Emphasis is mine.

              That statement took me completely by surprise. The Harbeth User Group is full of information of such nature. That's the type of thing that one won't find in the mainstream audiophile lingo, but yet I find them being much more informative and important than most of the myths peddled in the audiophile literature.

              The sense of distance and spacial location has everything to do with the ambiance - the richly textured and multi-layered sound that is very specific to the acoustics of the recording hall. I believe that the ambiance constitutes a significant amount of energy to the total sound (is there any quantitative measure on this?).

              Many low-fi speakers are not able to reproduce the micro details in the ambiance - so they came out as noise. The music would mask these noise so normally we are not aware of their presence, but those who are less endowed and have to live with cheap speakers for some length of time would know the difficultly of trying to have a conversation while the music is on. We have to shout through the noise that we don't usually hear. In contrast with a hi-fi speaker holding a conversion is a lot more easeful even when the music is rather loud. I have the impression that some speakers, especially the so called hi-fi/analytical speakers are filtering out the ambiance, and the energy balance shifted to the direct sound of the instruments.

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