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HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

The Harbeth User Group is the primary channel for public communication with Harbeth's HQ. If you have a 'scientific mind' and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - audio equipment decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual Science of Audio sub-forum area of HUG is your place. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and should be accessible to non-experts and able to be tried-out at home without deep technical knowledge. From a design perspective, today's award winning Harbeths could not have been designed any other way.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings area is you. If you are quite set in your subjectivity, then HUG is likely to be a bit too fact based for you, as many of the contributors have maximised their pleasure in home music reproduction by allowing their head to rule their heart. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area only, although HUG is really not the best place to have these sort of purely subjective airings.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters and Harbeth does not necessarily agree with the contents of any member contributions, especially in the Subjective Soundings area, and has no control over external content.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Oct. 2017}
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Position of 40.2s

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  • Position of 40.2s

    I have finally ordered a pair of 40.2s, which should be here in about one month.

    Specially to those who have had the chance to hear to the 40.2s in different rooms or in rooms large enough to experiment with different positions, I would like to ask what you have found to be the optimal speaker to listener distance and the best speaker to speaker distance.

    I will be moving to a new house that is now in the initial design phase and I would like to plan for a good listening setting in our living room. I certainly have no interest in having a living room look in any way like a control or mastering room, but perhaps some few things (like size, proportions, and speaker/listener positions) could be addressed during the architectural design of the house.

  • #2
    Since no one seems to have responded to your query, let me just mention my experience with M40s (the M40.2s should be similar though a bit more room friendly, perhaps). I have my speakers 7 feet apart, and I listen sitting 4 to 4 1/2 feet from a line drawn from one speaker to the other - near field listening. The M40s are totally coherent at this close range. Rather than describe my room, I'll include photos once I've learned the process for attaching them. Meanwhile, congratulations on your purchase of the M40.2s and on the designing and building of a new house!

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    • #3
      Congratulations with your new 40.2 and the opportunity to make adjustments to your new listening environment before it is even buildt. I have had my 40.2 for a hear now. They are very easy to integrate in my 25 sqm living room despite their considerable size. Speakers are placed on "long" wall apprx 50 cm from the wall and 2.5-2,7 meters apart. Make sure they have at least 1 m from side walls, or else I would have considered some room treatment. I sit apprx 3 meters from them. Untreated, all wooden living room from 1949. The play wonderfully in my room, at least on low to mederate listening levels. Should probably consider some measurements and possibly room treatment for louder listening (and possibly subwoofers as well). There is no bass boom with the 40.2, despite the speakers being large for my moderate rooom.

      Cannot provide advice on room design. The best of luck!

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      • #4
        As oes77 says, the M40.2s should be easy to integrate into whatever room design you come up with, unless it's a very small room. But unless you plan to use them in a home theater system on which you watch movies featuring earthquakes and atomic explosions, I can't imagine a need for subwoofers.

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        • #5
          Hi, I was away for some days. Thank you for your responses. Ned, you are listening very close to the speakers!

          After asking here i did some reading about small room acoustics. Most articles and information are related to studio design, which I believe has a different set of objectives as a "playback" room. I reread Linkwitz's AES paper on room reflections (http://www.linkwitzlab.com/AES123-final2.pdf ), which i think is one of the most interesting and pertinent for home playback rooms. He notes the advantage of listening closer to the speakers (listening position A vs B on his paper) and avoiding walls within at least 1m. I believe a large distance from the back wall, like he has, is also important (this is recognized in studio and home settings), and he has around 2m distance from the front wall too.

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          • #6
            I think Linkwitz - as you say, Madera - has some very pertinent things to say about the listening room. And yes, I am sitting rather close to my M40s. But it doesn't seem that close since all the sound - on decent recordings - seems to be coming from well behind the speakers. They virtually disappear. (This does not pertain to early stereo recordings in which the engineers tended to exaggerate stereo separation by having some instruments or voices firmly in the left speaker, and some firmly in the right). By sitting closer to the speakers one is able to listen at a lower volume which helps reduce the amount of reflected sound, I believe.

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