Announcement

Collapse

HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

The Harbeth User Group is the primary channel for public communication with Harbeth's HQ. If you have a 'scientific mind' and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - audio equipment decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual Science of Audio sub-forum area of HUG is your place. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and should be accessible to non-experts and able to be tried-out at home without deep technical knowledge. From a design perspective, today's award winning Harbeths could not have been designed any other way.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings area is you. If you are quite set in your subjectivity, then HUG is likely to be a bit too fact based for you, as many of the contributors have maximised their pleasure in home music reproduction by allowing their head to rule their heart. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area only, although HUG is really not the best place to have these sort of purely subjective airings.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters and Harbeth does not necessarily agree with the contents of any member contributions, especially in the Subjective Soundings area, and has no control over external content.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Oct. 2017}
See more
See less

DSP: Adjusting far field based on near field

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • DSP: Adjusting far field based on near field

    Hello,

    Time ago in a thread in the HUG i saw an idea to do room correction (i can not find the thread now). It was to measure the speaker in very nearfield, then measure it in the listening position and create the curves to compensate for the room problems. That would make the speaker sound far field (with the rooms problems), like it sounds 15 cm from it.

    So this is different from having a curve or flat response to emulate with the correction.

    Yesterday i was reading information about ELAC brand subwoofer and i found thats the way they are doing room correction. In fact they create an iOS/Android app, and use the phone mic to measure the subwoofer, because that " bad" mic is used both in nearfield and farfield it does not need to be a good mic.

    I also saw they created a new amp with DSP, 100w 8 Ohm, that also have automatic room correction and i suppose same philosophy, what i dont know is if it could be used for speakers or only for a subwoofer.

    http://elac.com/product/debut-series...ted-amplifier/

  • #2
    Bargain ELAC?

    That ELAC amplifier is very interesting for more modest systems. 600 dollars for a 2x100 watt amplifier with digital inputs, subwoofer integration and dsp room correction is quite a bargain. It also looks good. My only question is about the real power output, as Elac does not specify how this is measured. If it is 100 watt peak, it would be a bit meagre for all but the smallest rooms.

    Comment


    • #3
      More info?

      Originally posted by willem View Post
      That ELAC amplifier is very interesting for more modest systems. 600 dollars for a 2x100 watt amplifier with digital inputs, subwoofer integration and dsp room correction is quite a bargain. It also looks good. My only question is about the real power output, as Elac does not specify how this is measured. If it is 100 watt peak, it would be a bit meagre for all but the smallest rooms.
      Looks promising, probably cool running and lightweight with class D. I do wish there was more information about the 'loudness' which they suggest can be tailored to suit, no online manual seems available. Also they describe some way of (automatically by the amp) monitoring the input voltage so it is only as needed (might fix any input clipping??).
      Getting to know my C7ES3

      Comment


      • #4
        Bad microphone?

        Originally posted by kerouack View Post
        Hello,

        Time ago in a thread in the HUG i saw an idea to do room correction (i can not find the thread now). It was to measure the speaker in very nearfield, then measure it in the listening position and create the curves to compensate for the room problems. That would make the speaker sound far field (with the rooms problems), like it sounds 15 cm from it.

        So this is different from having a curve or flat response to emulate with the correction.
        If the speaker is designed to perform flat (within its bandwidth) then I think the two things should not be different. 15 cm seems to me too near, at least for a full range multi driver speaker.

        Yesterday i was reading information about ELAC brand subwoofer and i found thats the way they are doing room correction. In fact they create an iOS/Android app, and use the phone mic to measure the subwoofer, because that " bad" mic is used both in nearfield and farfield it does not need to be a good mic.
        Using the same "bad" instrument to make different measurements could maybe result in a precise but not accurate set of measures, if the instrument is always "bad" in the same way. I don't know if it will suffice for the purpose of this correction system.

        Comment


        • #5
          Peak power?

          Precise specifications of the ELAC amplifier are still subject to change, but unfortunately 100 watt is peak power or something similar.

          Comment

          Working...
          X