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HUG - here for all audio enthusiasts

Since its inception ten years ago, the Harbeth User Group's ambition has been to create a lasting knowledge archive. Knowledge is based on facts and observations. Knowledge is timeless. Knowledge is human independent and replicatable. However, we live in new world where thanks to social media, 'facts' have become flexible and personal. HUG operates in that real world.

HUG has two approaches to contributor's Posts. If you have, like us, a scientific mind and are curious about how the ear works, how it can lead us to make the right - and wrong - decisions, and about the technical ins and outs of audio equipment, how it's designed and what choices the designer makes, then the factual area of HUG is for you. The objective methods of comparing audio equipment under controlled conditions has been thoroughly examined here on HUG and elsewhere and can be easily understood and tried with negligible technical knowledge.

Alternatively, if you just like chatting about audio and subjectivity rules for you, then the Subjective Soundings sub-forum is you. If upon examination we think that Posts are better suited to one sub-forum than than the other, they will be redirected during Moderation, which is applied throughout the site.

Questions and Posts about, for example, 'does amplifier A sounds better than amplifier B' or 'which speaker stands or cables are best' are suitable for the Subjective Soundings area.

The Moderators' decision is final in all matters regarding what appears here. That said, very few Posts are rejected. HUG Moderation individually spell and layout checks Posts for clarity but due to the workload, Posts in the Subjective Soundings area, from Oct. 2016 will not be. We regret that but we are unable to accept Posts that present what we consider to be free advertising for products that Harbeth does not make.

That's it! Enjoy!

{Updated Nov. 2016A}
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Acoustic treatment AND room correction DSP together?

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  • Acoustic treatment AND room correction DSP together?

    Has anyone tried a combination of acoustic room treatment and dsp processing with room correction capabilities?

    One advantage of this approach appears to be less critical positioning of loudspeakers within the listening room.

    Cheers,
    Chris

  • #2
    Room treatment and cosmetics

    Yup... here's the skinny on both.

    DSP correction is quite tricky because it only seems to "remedy" for one particular sweet-spot / listening position. Also, it is inherently dangerous as overzealous electronic correction can result in over-driving your amps and loudspeakers to try and "compensate" for null spots and suckouts (or worse yet, the DSP adding sustained high enery reverb to compensate for extreme notches in the perceived frequencies). Harbeths aren't exactly robust like Behringer or Cerwin-Vega! honkers. :P

    Plain old-fashioned mechanical room treatment is much more versatile in taming the overall room acoustics and works across a wider area of the listening room. They're also loads of fun to experiment with as you move bass-traps, diffusors, potted plants, thick drapes, Ikea bookshelves, and stuff etc etc all over the room and then have a re-listen (or re-measure, if you're technically analytical) each time.

    Only problem with room treatment is that they tend to have very poor Spousal-acceptance-factors, and can be very unsightly especially if you're deploying bass traps & broadband absorbers which are naturally big (it's a physics thing) and bulky items.

    As for using both those approaches at the same time, only you can decide which one you want to place more weightage on. It really depends on many factors such as what is your appetite for equipment & loudspeaker risk vs. how far you can push your luck installing huge ugly panels and remodeling the room and getting away with it.

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    • #3
      First mechanical then DSP

      Originally posted by loud_speak View Post
      Has anyone tried a combination of acoustic room treatment and dsp processing with room correction capabilities?

      One advantage of this approach appears to be less critical positioning of loudspeakers within the listening room.

      Cheers,
      Chris

      Hi Chris, I used both mechanical and DSP treatments and love it. I would propose using mechanical treatments to the best you could in your listening environment, engaged in the DSP for the final "cleanup" for the frequency responses in your listening space.
      DSP would have both Focus and Global settings, one for the sit and position listening while another would be good for a all around listening.

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