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Thread: Test equipment (reference-standard microphones)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    South of England, UK
    Posts
    4,393

    Default Test equipment (reference-standard microphones)

    As I mentioned recently, we have recently invested several thousand dollars in new test equipment. Although Bruel & Kjaer has always been at the heart of our test set, we have not had the luxury of duplication across the various sites that I may need to measure speakers: on the production line, in the test bunker (for grading drive units), at the Old Dairy (open space for measuing) or The Stable (mini deadroom) or at home. I have made do with 'clone' amateur test equipment - especially microphones, and that has introduced a degree of uncertainly which has wasted valuable time.

    So, back to B&K, the best, the most accurate, with traceable standards and a very long life. For example, here is the actual curve (also supplied as a mini-CD) for the best of the new microphone capsules we have just purchased from B&K Denmark http://www.bksv.com/.

    As you can see from the curve below the yellow zone reresents +/- 1dB, and this specimen deviates from perfectly flat by a maximum of only about 0.5dB at the very highest frequencies and is, for all practical purpsoses, perfect. Bigger picture here: http://www.harbeth.co.uk/images/B&Krefmic640.png

    An accurate microphone, a reliable and known acoustic space - even if not a perfelcty relection free one, and a flat amplifier (another sad story) are paramount should you wish to design quality speaker systems.

    We now meet our ISO9001 obligations in this important area.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    121

    Default Frequency response of B&K microphone capsules

    Quote Originally Posted by A.S. View Post
    As you can see from the curve below the yellow zone reresents +/- 1dB, and this specimen deviates from perfectly flat by a maximum of only about 0.5dB at the very highest frequencies and is, for all practical purpsoses, perfect. Bigger picture here: http://www.harbeth.co.uk/images/B&Krefmic640.png

    An accurate microphone, a reliable and known acoustic space - even if not a perfectly reflection free one, and a flat amplifier (another sad story) are paramount should you wish to design quality speaker systems.
    I don't seem to be able to view the microphone frequency response curve mentioned above. Would it be possible to supply a working link?

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