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Thread: Harbeth SHL5 specific

  1. #381
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    17

    Default Oddvar Stands

    I can endorse the earlier poster's comments wrt to the Ikea Oddvar Stools as stands.
    I swapped from some open frame metal ones (the ones supplied by the Malaysian/Singapore distributor I believe) to the Oddvar's and can report a very definite benefit. And at A$13 each - priced just right.
    I use Herbie's Big fat Dot's (3 per speaker) under the 5's to decouple. I have also experimented to great effect with a barely inflated 12 inch child's inner tube under the 5's: although they are hard to balance.

  2. #382
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    Jan 2006
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    Default

    Surely "Happy Listener"?
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

  3. #383
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    459

    Default Shl = ......

    Just to add to what Alan mentioned above...SHL = Super Happy Listener. )

  4. #384
    audiocraze Guest

    Default Cables and interconnects

    Guys,

    I just purchased a set of used Lavardin IT and Harbeth SHL-5 (30th Anniversary edition) and now would like to get opinions what are the best power cable, interconnect and speaker cable for this combo. I live in USA, by the way. I am currently using Crystal Clear Audio Master Class interconnect (silver cable) and for the speaker cable is a DIY Audioquest 9AWG copper cable from a friend. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestion as to what cables are highly recommended in order to get the best out of this combo set. I am thiking of trying Clear Day Audio speaker cable (silver). Has anyone had any experience with this? Also what interconnect is highly recommended? Thanks.

    {Moderator's comment: As you will read in the small print at the bottom of the forum page we do not encourage discussion about cables here on the Harbeth User Group. Also your post is in the wrong sub-forum. It should be in the Sandbox.}

  5. #385
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    109

    Default Cables

    Audiocraze
    My experience of SHL-5's with the Clear Day Audio speaker cables is very positive; see my testimonial at:
    http://www.cleardaycables.com/testimonials1.php
    I use 2 pairs of double shotgun cables to bi-wire the speakers.
    I have no experience of the Clear Day interconnect; I have balanced Cawsey connections from my DAC to power amp.
    David

  6. #386
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    indonesia
    Posts
    1

    Default Amplifier and CDP

    Heard that SHL5 is well matched with LFD integrated zero Mark III, can anyone tell what good CDP to match with and what cables to use ? Thanks.

  7. #387
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Singapore
    Posts
    459

    Default You don't need exotic equipment ....

    Quote Originally Posted by naimindo View Post
    Heard that SHL5 is well matched with LFD integrated zero Mark III, can anyone tell what good CDP to match with and what cables to use ? Thanks.
    Hi Naimindo,

    I am an LFD LE III with SHL-5 user & have the Rotel RCD-971 as digital source & a $100 vintage Micro-Seiki MB-14 Belt driven turntable as analogue source & setup as a whole sounds very good & musically expressive nonetheless. CD interconnect is via a $30 QED (circa 1982) & spk cable is something similar to QED 79 strand but even cheaper than 79 strand. No fuss at all. Just pure musical enjoyment. If you feel that you want something more exotic like Nagra, Goldmund, Vimak, Krell, Accuphase or Mark Levinson, by all means. How much better than a cheap Rotel, i'll leave it to you to decide.

    One thing for sure is that one don't need exotic equipment to gain access into the musical prowess of Harbeths.

  8. #388
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    England
    Posts
    826

    Default LFD Mk. 1V

    There is a Mk.IV version of the LFD integrated now and this is a fair improvement on the previous model, especially in the bass. I also get very good results with Croft and Sugden amps at less cost.

    I can recommend the Rega Apollo and Saturn as CD players which set the benchmark for inexpensive players. I've heard much worse at 10 X their price.

    As to cables, I would suggest you go with something decent but not outrageously priced. Try the Chord Rumour and Odyssey, both very good and realistically priced plus one of their incons to suit.

  9. #389
    valvefan Guest

    Default SHL5 super tweeter

    Hi Alan,

    I recently bought a used pair of SHL-5 speakers. They are wonderful! I adore them!

    I live in calgary and I just met Noel Nolan from Skylan and got one of his magnetic speaker grille removal tools.

    I easily popped off the grilles and found that one of the super tweeters is dented (pushed in). I listened to each speaker independantly and they sound the same to me.

    What do you suggest that I do? If the speakers sound identical to my ears, should I have the super-tweeter repaired or replaced? Is it reasonable to remove the front panel myself and gently try to push the diaphragm back out?

    I would appreciate your advice and the advice of other members of the forum.

    Thanks

    Pete

  10. #390
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    England
    Posts
    826

    Default Super Tweeter

    Not certain what the official answer might be but if the dent is small, I would be tempted to ignore it and keep the covers on. I believe that the only change due to a large dent would be a slight difference in the dispersion characteristic but you say the two speakers sound identical, so it can't be too problematical.

    If it is worrying you, I am sure the distributor would help.

    {Moderator's comment: thanks for the input which we agree with. Did you Register for extended Warranty on the Harbeth web site?}

  11. #391
    valvefan Guest

    Default Extended warranty question

    I bought my SHL5s directly from the original owner. I do have the original paperwork.

    Am I entitled to warranty benefits and services?

    Thanks

    Pete

    {Moderator's comment: Unfortunately, regardless of whether the original owner Registered for extended warranty or not, the Harbeth Warranty is not transferable from the first to the second owner. But it's worth a nice friendly note to the importer.}

  12. #392
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    148

    Default

    Hey, Pete

    Your importer up there is Planet of Sound in Toronto, www.planetofsounddistribution.com

    Hope this helps!

  13. #393
    valvefan Guest

    Default Super Tweeter fix

    OK

    Thanks

    Pete

  14. #394
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7

    Default Veneers

    Harbeth cabinet veneer question
    Hi Alan

    I just realized that some Harbeth cabinets are veneered both INSIDE and outside. If there is veneer on the inside, wouldn't different veneers have different sonic characters?

    Ian

  15. #395
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    Default The sound of veneers?

    Quote Originally Posted by ianm0 View Post
    ... If there is veneer on the inside, wouldn't different veneers have different sonic characters?
    In the light of the (incomplete) thread on 'snake oil' and copywriting here I present three answers for your consideration. All three are right and all three are wrong, as there are no absolutes in audio. You decide!

    Answer A: "Of course, it's a well documented fact amongst Harbeth's worldwide customer base that the more exotic veneers including the sumptuous rosewood and breathtaking ebony fully capture the very essence of the Harbeth sound, allowing the cabinet to breath with heartfelt empathy with the music .... moving the listener to tears with the richness of tone which can be felt deep in the sole. A true releasing the full potential of the latent Harbeth sound which we all knew was possible, but only just achieved thanks to these marvellous veneers ..."

    or

    Answer B: "At best, the total veneer thickness represents under 10% of the thickness of the cabinet side/top panels and even less of the usually somewhat thicker front and back panels. We do not believe that a laminate representing such a small addition to the rigid MDF base substrate can have any significant or audible effect on sonic performance, although in the laboratory it is of course possible that precision measuring instruments may detect some minute differences in elasticity. Therefore, make a decision on the veneer on cosmetic grounds alone ..."

    or

    Answer C: "Under laboratory measurement conditions it is of course possible that precision measuring instruments may detect some minute differences in elasticity. Therefore, just to play safe, you should select the best exotic veneer which is often stated as ebony to be sure you have the best possible sound ..."


    If you like I can easily whistle up a few more answers .... or maybe you can write them yourselves!
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

  16. #396
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Harrow, UK
    Posts
    464

    Default Soul mates

    Quote Originally Posted by A.S. View Post
    ...deep in the sole...
    With Harbeth you can never put a foot wrong....

  17. #397
    Join Date
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    Location
    Canada
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    847

    Default Two veneers better than one {not necessarily}

    I'm aware of one speaker company that makes a point in its sales literature of saying that they veneer both the inside and the outside of the cabinet. I don't think they make any sonic claims for this, but they do say it makes for a more stable physical structure longterm, as any warpage or other stresses conveyed to the substrate by the veneer on one side will be counteracted by the veneer on the other.

    I don't know enough about woodworking to know whether this makes any sense or not.

    {Moderator's comment: perfect sense. It also depends upon panel thickness, and whether hot or cold pressed i.e. hot glue or room temp. glue.}

  18. #398
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    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    847

    Default Harbeth's (unofficial) guide to veneers

    Eucalyptus: Gives a light, burnished glowing tone. Very clear and rhythymically adept - very clear, lots of insight, best veneer for high frequency articulation. Also the best PRAT of any of the Harbeth veneers. For the listener who wants less of an emotional experience, more of a clear, cool, limpid insight into the music. The most cerebral of the veneers (though not entirely without emotion), but also good for rock music due to its excellent timing and rhythm. Can work with jazz, especially in smaller ensembles, but lovers of classical music, particularly large-scale orchestral music, will probably opt for one of the dark veneers.

    Cherry: the workhorse of the veneers. Clean sound across the audio band, a good "jack of all trades" veneer. When you don't want to choose between the sprightly, invigorating articulation of eucalyptus, and the darker more sonorous tonalities of rosewood or tiger ebony.

    Rosewood: unquestionably the most romantic of the veneers. Gives a rich, burnished, sumptuous glow to nearly all music. Particularly good with the 19th-century Romantic composers, but can surprise with its insight into both medieval music - think Gregorian chant in particular, but also Renaissance polyphony - darker folk music (Phil Ochs or Nick Drake, but definitely not Paul Simon), and even some electronica. Not for everyone, but those who love it will love it a lot.

    Tiger Ebony: an absolute monster of a veneer, it will thrill you with its resolution of the finest details of a Mahler symphony, but its hard-charging way with a bass line will not disappoint fans of Metallica and Megadeath, to say nothing of the more esoteric varieties of Nowegian death metal. Some may find its sheer scale and vividness overpowering - can be tamed somewhat by the use of single-ended triode tube amplifiers, which will still let this veneer rock to its full potential, while preserving the subtlety of quieter music.

  19. #399
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    Jan 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EricW View Post
    Eucalyptus: Gives a light, burnished glowing tone. ...
    Seriousy disturbing. When a reputed lawyer (trained to be objective) can pick up the pen and mimic the contemporary audio review writing style in a mere 48 hours, it explains why the industry is drowning in 'reviewers'. The problem is, I'm gagging for it now but just can't decide which veneer to go for as I like several types of music mentioned. I don't suppose Harbeth could make the baffle/case/back from three different veneers could they? Worth a punt perhaps? Small price adder?

    {Moderator's comment: Brilliant concept! It allows us to turn rejects into gold!}
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

  20. #400
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    288

    Default Purple prose for the people

    Quote Originally Posted by EricW View Post
    Eucalyptus: Gives a light, burnished glowing tone. Very clear and rhythymically adept - very clear, lots of insight, best veneer for high frequency articulation. Also the best PRAT of any of the Harbeth veneers. For the listener who wants less of an emotional experience, more of a clear, cool, limpid insight into the music. The most cerebral of the veneers (though not entirely without emotion), but also good for rock music due to its excellent timing and rhythm. Can work with jazz, especially in smaller ensembles, but lovers of classical music, particularly large-scale orchestral music, will probably opt for one of the dark veneers.

    Cherry: the workhorse of the veneers. Clean sound across the audio band, a good "jack of all trades" veneer. When you don't want to choose between the sprightly, invigorating articulation of eucalyptus, and the darker more sonorous tonalities of rosewood or tiger ebony.

    Rosewood: unquestionably the most romantic of the veneers. Gives a rich, burnished, sumptuous glow to nearly all music. Particularly good with the 19th-century Romantic composers, but can surprise with its insight into both medieval music - think Gregorian chant in particular, but also Renaissance polyphony - darker folk music (Phil Ochs or Nick Drake, but definitely not Paul Simon), and even some electronica. Not for everyone, but those who love it will love it a lot.

    Tiger Ebony: an absolute monster of a veneer, it will thrill you with its resolution of the finest details of a Mahler symphony, but its hard-charging way with a bass line will not disappoint fans of Metallica and Megadeath, to say nothing of the more esoteric varieties of Nowegian death metal. Some may find its sheer scale and vividness overpowering - can be tamed somewhat by the use of single-ended triode tube amplifiers, which will still let this veneer rock to its full potential, while preserving the subtlety of quieter music.
    Wow Eric! One of my favorites post from you on the HUG. It made me laugh a lot. Thanks for such a creative association between sounds and veneers. Uh... only a small mistake, Paul Simon is excellent with rosewood.

    Sébastien

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