Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 54

Thread: Speaker Finishes

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    288

    Default SHL5 in rosewood

    Hi everyone! This is my first post on the Harbeth User Group (HUG). First, I'd like to thank you all. This forum is mature, interesting and complete. I read a lot of posts since I'm planning to buy a pair of SHL5 in the next month. A wonderful speaker that I had the chance to hear twice in the last month.

    Concerning the finish, is there someone who can show me pictures of the current production of the SHL5 in rosewood finish?

    Thank you,

    Sebastien
    Montreal, Canada

    P.s. please note that French is my first language. I'll try to do my best to keep myself understood.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    841

    Default

    Bonjour, Sebastien, et bienvenue chez Harbeth! Ne vous inquiétez pas: votre anglais est excellent.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Merci pour l'accueil.

    Sebastien

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    148

    Default

    Hello, Sebastien

    I'm not sure you can get SHL 5's in rosewood, but here's a shot of them in rosenut, a cobination of rosewood/walnut

    http://pic8.audiogon.com/i/c/f/1269486764.jpg

    You'll love them whatever the finish-welcome aboard!

    Bob LaBarca
    State College, PA
    USA

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Hi Sebastien

    i hope this finds you...


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/21595634@N05/4476761925/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/21595634@N05/4476761935/


    it really is a beautiful finish. think the first photo is a slightly better representation, more dark brown than "red". Think the second photo is slightly lighter than what my eyes tell me. i am happy with the rosewood choice because my personal feeling if i chose a lighter coloured wood, it might draw more attention to themselves and also look "bigger" in my small living room - like a car.

    welcome!

    kittykat

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Wow! I really like the rosewood finish. It will help me in my decision.

    I have just sold my pair of Audio Physic Virgo III in a similar color. I loved the color but I'm looking for a more natural sound which I found with the SHL5.

    Sebastien

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    344

    Default

    yes, somehow the speakers remind me of the musical boxes of rouge. something you want to touch and feel. no other speaker finish has done this for me, maybe except an old walnut pair of scan dynas from the 70's.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    288

    Default

    There is a friend of mine who belives that like a musical instrument made of wood, a same speaker can sound different depending wood difference. About that, I'd like to know if an Harbeth speaker is made entirely of real wood or if it contains MDF (small particules of wood and glue)? Plus, is there only a small sheet of real wood on top of it with MDF below?

    Thanks,

    Sebastien

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastien View Post
    There is a friend of mine who belives that like a musical instrument made of wood, a same speaker can sound different depending wood difference. About that, I'd like to know if an Harbeth speaker is made entirely of real wood or if it contains MDF (small particules of wood and glue)? Plus, is there only a small sheet of real wood on top of it with MDF below?
    In this thread Alan explains the 'thin-wall' construction.

    From what I can gather (I may be wrong) the panels are 9mm MDF in a sandwich of veneers (veneered inside and out) and damped with strategically placed bitumen panels. (The thin wall allows some flexure at a known frequency but the flexure converts to heat in the bitumen panel thus damping any audible effect.)

    Also having a box made of thinner (than usual) panels made around a 'frame' of battens with front and rear panels that are screwed on gives a 'lossy' construction due to having lots of joints that can dissipate energy before it gets a chance to travel around the whole box. A normal mass produced thick MDF box with everything tongue & grooved and glued together would be 'seen' by unwanted energy as one large piece of wood and go around and around it without hitting a joint or gap.

    That is my (possibly flawed) interpretation.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    841

    Default

    I believe there is one other company that follows the "thin-wall" construction technique but uses plywood rather than MDF. I have seen certain other speaker companies (not building in the BBC style) tout plywood (e.g. birch ply) as superior to MDF due to greater rigidity. Not sure however if that's true, or if it matters.

    My understanding is also that Harbeth uses veneered MDF with damping applied. I wonder however if Alan might comment on whether there's any practical difference between MDF and plywood.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Spendor claim 'thin-wall' construction for their S3/5R model.

    EB acoustics use an MDF/ply/bitumen laminate (that they call Arcayne) but I don't know any more details.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    841

    Default

    ProAc also claims thin-wall construction, with birch-ply panels and bitumen.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    167

    Default

    The words "check it for yourself" and "impossible" come to mind.
    Harbeth PR,
    Harbeth UK

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.S. View Post
    Maple (P3ESR only) A few pairs of C7ES3 available incl. pair for Finnish customer*
    Hi Alan! Is there any new info according to the production of maple C7's ?

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EricW View Post
    ProAc also claims thin-wall construction, with birch-ply panels and bitumen.
    Im happy to be corrected but afaik proacs are mdf. Their philosophy might be different, they are not thin wall but thick hard solid bonded stuff. If you gently knock on their cabinets, they go “tock tock tock” unlike the “Tud tud tud” of Harbeths. Imho, i don’t consider Proac, like many others, speaker makers (philosophy more akin to diy off the shelf guys), as they don’t make any of their drivers as far as I know. It makes them basically cabinet guys and crossover tweakers, ditto Wilson Audio etc.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    South of England, UK
    Posts
    4,015

    Default

    I don't know the range in question (frankly, I don't need to) but one defining feature of the 'thin wall' BBC cabinet is removable front and/or back or both front and back. If both the front panel and back panel are glued into position, regardless of the actual thickness of the panel walls, the box cannot be tuned. And tuning of the cabinet is critical to achieving the Harbeth sound. So, the first thing to look for is which panels are held in by screws. And yes, if you buy drive units for beer money from vast factories churning them out by the tens or hundreds or thousands each day then you cannot realistically expect sophisticated engineering. At the very best, you could expect a stable QC assuming that all the variables were well understood and controlled. But there again, even that can't be assumed.

    I'm always incredulous that the consumer will pay $50,000 for a pair of admittedly novel or beautiful speakers using mass produced drive unit with a total rolled-up package cost to the manufacturer as low as $500 - or less. Possibly much less. To my mind that is complete madness - as foolish as buying a brand new, upper range BMW with an engine made in a Soviet factory during WW2. The car would indeed be impressive from the outside but a test run would reveal the performance was incapable of concealing the fundamental weakness of the engine.
    Alan A. Shaw
    Designer, owner
    Harbeth Audio UK

  17. #37
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I just received my P3ESRs in maple, and very beautiful they are, too. I did notice a few points where the surface was raised, almost bumpy, no doubt where the wood was originally knotted. Wondering if these spots are likely to "erupt" and possibly split, or whether the wood is stabilized? It's a remarkable finish, almost butterscotchy, and does lovely things with caught light.

    best,

    o

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by orkney View Post
    ... I did notice a few points where the surface was raised, almost bumpy, no doubt where the wood was originally knotted. Wondering if these spots are likely to "erupt" and possibly split, or whether the wood is stabilized? ...
    I also saw something similar at a dealer recently. It was from one of his demo SHL5 speaker with the cherry finish. I was surprised about that and also wonder what would happen with this wood in the future.

    Sebastien

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.S. View Post
    I'm always incredulous that the consumer will pay $50,000 for a pair of admittedly novel or beautiful speakers using mass produced drive unit with a total rolled-up package cost to the manufacturer as low as $500 - or less. Possibly much less. To my mind that is complete madness - as foolish as buying a brand new, upper range BMW with an engine made in a Soviet factory during WW2. The car would indeed be impressive from the outside but a test run would reveal the performance was incapable of concealing the fundamental weakness of the engine.
    Guys,
    only eyes can see. Ears can't. Ears listen. What if Alan would design a speaker with a single custom full range cone, screwed on a low density fibreboard, wich would play heavenly? Would you buy it? Because I would...
    The rest of the story is good food -and income of course- for another modern successful invention of our consumer world, the psychologists.
    By the way, I don't remember any famous maestro or orchestra performer, or great music artist, having paid a fortune for exotic speakers or components... At least here in my country, where I happen to know a a lot of them...
    Cheers,
    Thanos

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.S. View Post
    incredulous that the consumer will pay $50,000...
    sure beats me. somehow somewhere along the way "modern art" came into the picture. strange but true. something to ponder over the weekend.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •