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The McGurk effect - Seeing is believing and how it may relate to audio equipment

TimVG

New member
I don't believe the topic of the McGurk effect has been this discussed yet in the HUG.

In short: "The McGurk effect is a perceptual phenomenon that demonstrates an interaction between hearing and vision in speech perception. The illusion occurs when the auditory component of one sound is paired with the visual component of another sound, leading to the perception of a third sound"

You can find more detailed information on Wikipedia and other websites by simply googling "McGurk Effect"

Here is a video demonstrating the McGurk Effect

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-lN8vWm3m0

This is a terrific example of how the human brain interacts with our senses. Could this be linked to hearing non-existing differences between certain equipment? Seeing is hearing after all.

Comments, anyone?

Tim
 

Kumar Kane

New member
The best upgrade of all - a glass or two of wine!

The best upgrade of all - a glass or two of wine!

This is a terrific example of how the human brain interacts with our senses. Could this be linked to hearing non-existing differences between certain equipment? Seeing is hearing after all.

Comments, anyone?

Tim
It is more than just seeing, sight is just one of the senses.

And what we finally think we hear is what the brain does after processing inputs from all senses. Not just the signals that the body's transducers, the ears, provide it with. Or just what the eyes see. The brain also adds into the mix, what lies in its memory banks. For instance, even if the expensive bit of electronics is out of sight, the brain will still process this information to decide the quality of sound it hears. I suspect it will also be influenced by reviews read, and knowledge of how much was paid for it.

Other influences also come into play to trick the brain. Music sounds better to me when the lights are low. I am pretty certain that even the effect of alcohol on the brain has a role to play. Music from my system always sounds better to me after a couple of glasses of wine or single malt.

The good thing about getting off the equipment upgrade bandwagon is that now I have more to spare for buying music and good wine:)
 

Macjager

New member
To hell with buddies opinions

To hell with buddies opinions

But, when doing A-B testing, we need all of our faculties functioning at their best, anyone who does testing or commenting in an environment that has external influences, ie "me and my buddies were testing..." will result in flawed test results. If we enjoy our music, no matter the influence, that is what its about, however if we want to get a sense of what sounds better in reproducing sound, then we need blind A-B testing, is a somewhat controlled environment, buddies be damned.

I figure that if I get rid of some of the expensive equipment that I currently own, and use some of the less expensive stuff, that sounds just as good, I too will have loads of money for fine single malt and hundreds of hours of new music that I can purchase...

cheers
george
 

hifi_dave

Well-known member
Hidden from view .....

Hidden from view .....

I've always conducted 'out of sight' demos whenever possible. The equipment is on racks behind the customer who cannot see what is going on when I make a change, unless he/she chooses to peep.
 

SDRichard

New member
No visuals

No visuals

Facinating. I wonder if this is why music sounds better when you listen to it in the dark (less irrelevant visual cues).

Richard

Another explanation here
 
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